Personal History - Genealogy

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  • How Mary Tedesco of “Genealogy Roadshow” Discovered Family History

    Ancestry Blog
    Jessica Murray
    27 Mar 2015 | 7:44 am
    We have loved tuning in to Mary Tedesco, researcher on the latest season of “Genealogy Roadshow” on PBS, so we were thrilled to have had the opportunity to interview her.Mary, founder of Origins Italy shares how she was first introduced to family history, and it starts with a shared Ancestry.com login. And while we recognize the humor in that, it’s not recommended for privacy reasons.Mary went on to note how people can participate in the next season of “Genealogy Roadshow.” Tune in to learn how:
  • Mar 26, Throwback Thursday - Long Strange Trip Maker

    Writing Your Life Story Blog
    26 Mar 2015 | 3:57 pm
    Today's Throwback Thursday blog post comes from March 20, 2011 when I wrote about how Owsley Stanley, best known as the outlaw chef of primo acid (aka LSD) had passed away. Owsley was also closely connected with the Grateful Dead. That band has been incredibly influential on a lot of lives and many excited Dead-heads will be in Chicago this July for the Reunion Shows of the four core remaining Grateful Dead members.
  • Ritergal’s Birthday

    The Heart and Craft of Life Writing
    1 Apr 2015 | 8:53 am
    Heavens to Betsy, today is Ritergal’s birthday, and  I just realized she is a teenager, In fact, she has been a teenager for a couple of years. That could explain a lot of things, but I won’t go into that. In honor of her birthday, she’s my guest today, sharing her flash memoir, previously unread and unedited by me:That woman, the one whose fingers I’m using, thinks I’m only fifteen, and she thinks she calls the shots. Little does she know. I’m ageless. For several decades I lurked in a hidden closet of her soul, just beyond her awareness, waiting for the right moment to make…
  • North Carolina County Marriage Records

    Ancestry Blog
    Anne Gillespie Mitchell
    1 Apr 2015 | 7:18 am
    Do you have North Carolina ancestors?  Well you may need to take a day off from work or tell your family you simply aren’t available.Ancestry has launched North Carolina, Marriage Records, 1741-2011 and this data collection includes images of marriage bonds, licenses, certificates, and registers from 87 different counties.On the data collection page, check out the browse section on the right hand side to see which counties are available and what records are included for that county.Check the browse section on the right side of the data collection page to see what is available.And check…
  • My Geneaholic Wednesday - 1 April 2015

    The Geneaholic
    1 Apr 2015 | 10:10 pm
    I didn't play one April Fool prank today, and don't think I was pranked either.  Darn.*  Read email and blogs, and wrote Maggie's 100th Birthday - Post 353 for (Not So) Wordless Wednesday.  That was fun!  Answered email, added to the Best Of post, and checked Facebook.  Wasted an hour, I fear.*  Left at 11 a.m. for McDonalds for lunch, then to the library for John's group, and then the CVGS Bored meeting.  Dragged on until after 2.  The auditorium is not a good place for a Bored meeting! *  Home by 2:30 p.m., read email,…
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    Writing Your Life Story Blog

  • Mar 26, Throwback Thursday - Long Strange Trip Maker

    26 Mar 2015 | 3:57 pm
    Today's Throwback Thursday blog post comes from March 20, 2011 when I wrote about how Owsley Stanley, best known as the outlaw chef of primo acid (aka LSD) had passed away. Owsley was also closely connected with the Grateful Dead. That band has been incredibly influential on a lot of lives and many excited Dead-heads will be in Chicago this July for the Reunion Shows of the four core remaining Grateful Dead members.
  • Mar 24, Spiritual Biographies Can Inspire

    24 Mar 2015 | 4:48 pm
    If you have ever read a biography, memoir or life story about a saint or a person who has been on a spiritual journey you probably recognize the power of those stories to inspire. This inspiration is a great benefit of any well-told life story that includes how a person has dealt with matters of faith.
  • Mar 19, Throwback Thursday - Right Time to Tell Your Story

    19 Mar 2015 | 9:24 am
    It's that day of the week and time for another of my Throwback Thursday posts. This time I bring you back to a post I wrote this time last year. It was March 10 of 2014 and I reflected on the importance of preserving our stories (an ongoing theme with me), but not waiting too long to do it. This is because someone I'd worked with had just passed away.
  • Mar 17, Your Story is Your Contribution to History

    17 Mar 2015 | 2:33 pm
    The history we study in schools and see unfolding in media is important. We want to understand the world we live in and how past events have contributed to the shape (for better or worse) that we are in. But each of us has a personal take on life and it your story that is your contribution to history, both your personal and family history, and its connection to the world at large.
  • Mar 15, Uncle Arnie at Ninety

    15 Mar 2015 | 10:50 am
    A couple of days ago my uncle, Arnie Galbraith, turned 90. I wasn't able to travel to attend the celebration, but I understand it was a good one. Celebrating milestones is part of family history and I hope you get an opportunity to do that. My sister here in Albuquerque teamed with me on a collage book with tribute for Arnie and it was fun to look through pictures and reminisce.
 
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    The Heart and Craft of Life Writing

  • Ritergal’s Birthday

    1 Apr 2015 | 8:53 am
    Heavens to Betsy, today is Ritergal’s birthday, and  I just realized she is a teenager, In fact, she has been a teenager for a couple of years. That could explain a lot of things, but I won’t go into that. In honor of her birthday, she’s my guest today, sharing her flash memoir, previously unread and unedited by me:That woman, the one whose fingers I’m using, thinks I’m only fifteen, and she thinks she calls the shots. Little does she know. I’m ageless. For several decades I lurked in a hidden closet of her soul, just beyond her awareness, waiting for the right moment to make…
  • Respecting Your Writer’s Voice

    24 Mar 2015 | 2:16 am
    “It’s critically important to find an editor who will respect your writer’s voice and not try to change it into her own.” Electric agreement surged through  the room during a Penn Writers self-publishing workshop offered last weekend by acclaimed Pittsburgh author Kathleen Shoop. Heads nodded, and a ripple of “Mmm hmm” rose and fell. I exchanged nods with friends sitting on both sides. Then a memory tempered my thought. Ten years ago a group fondly referred to as “angel editors” banded together to help a mutual friend – I’ll call him Will – hammer a complex memoir…
  • How and Why to Write about JOY

    16 Mar 2015 | 2:21 pm
    This advice to talk about our joys struck home with me when I saw it the other day. Not surprisingly, I immediately thought how it applies to writing – specifically to life writing – and how happy stories spread joy.In The Heart and Craft of Lifewriting, I discuss the way many people tend to shy away from discussing success and joy. “I don’t want to sound like I’m bragging,” some people say. “I don’t people to envy me,” or “I don’t want them to think I think I’m better than they are,” or “I don’t want to make people sad because they missed out.” These are valid…
  • Hidden Treasures

    7 Mar 2015 | 11:56 am
    I just discovered a  hidden treasure trove. I’m glad I didn’t give into the urge to purge. I almost tossed old sympathy letters unread. What relevance, I wondered, could I possibly find in condolence letters written to my now-deceased mother-in-law nearly fifty years ago when her husband died? What a surprise to find that I’m learning so much from reading between the lines. I hardly knew my father-in-law, Ezra Lippincott. We never lived near them and had only been married six years when he died. Quite likely he found his son’s young wife as baffling as I found him. We never…
  • A Grounding [TAP?] Root of the Tree of Life Writing

    25 Feb 2015 | 9:10 am
    Guest post by Denis Ledoux, founder of The Memoir Network.Just as with so many big projects in life, you’ll benefit by taking a moment to consider why you ought to start—or continue—to write this memoir of yours that is intriguing you and what role you anticipate it will play in your life.I like to think of my thoughts below as one of the roots of the Tree Of Life Writing that needs to be nurtured.You may not know it yet, but your impulse to write is probably solid.In late autumn of 1988, as people were hunkering down for another Maine winter, I was asked to read from my first…
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    Ancestry Blog

  • North Carolina County Marriage Records

    Anne Gillespie Mitchell
    1 Apr 2015 | 7:18 am
    Do you have North Carolina ancestors?  Well you may need to take a day off from work or tell your family you simply aren’t available.Ancestry has launched North Carolina, Marriage Records, 1741-2011 and this data collection includes images of marriage bonds, licenses, certificates, and registers from 87 different counties.On the data collection page, check out the browse section on the right hand side to see which counties are available and what records are included for that county.Check the browse section on the right side of the data collection page to see what is available.And check…
  • ABC’s of Commonly Used Nicknames (A-C)

    Jessica Murray
    31 Mar 2015 | 10:14 am
    If you’ve spent a significant amount of time researching your family history, you’ve probably run into many of your ancestors referred to with a nickname in records, including censuses.Being familiar with nicknames that your ancestor may have used could help you overcome that “brick wall.” It can also prevent the frustration of discovering that that “other” person is actually someone you’ve already identified in your tree.Keep in mind that some nicknames may have been common in the region where your ancestor came from, and there are many nicknames not…
  • Ode to Lou Szucs: Ancestry’s Employee Number One Retires

    Kristie Wells
    31 Mar 2015 | 4:36 am
    Lou Szucs, photo credit: Trish Szucs StWe knew this day would come. In fact, we even knew the date it would happen. But this morning it finally sunk in … Loretto Dennis (“Lou”) Szucs is officially retiring today.I am filled with mixed emotions as while I am thrilled for her to be able to spend more time with her family, her wise counsel and incredible spirit will be missed.Lou ‘officially’ joined Ancestry in 1992 as employee number one, and to say she has been through a few changes would be a massive understatement. She has also worn many hats over the last 23 years,…
  • WDYTYA Recap: Sean Hayes Finds Order in Petty Session Court Records

    Ancestry Team
    30 Mar 2015 | 6:39 am
    Trouble seemed to follow Sean Hayes’ ancestors down generations and even over an ocean. But trouble, especially when it led to clashes with the law, became a lynchpin in uncovering Sean’s story.Researching ancestors in Ireland has always required some creativity due to the loss of 19th-century census returns. Censuses are a staple in U.S. research, and researching families in Ireland without them can be a challenge. But it can also lead to the discovery of some very fascinating alternative records. One of these is the Petty Sessions Court records.The Petty Sessions Courts were organized…
  • How Mary Tedesco of “Genealogy Roadshow” Discovered Family History

    Jessica Murray
    27 Mar 2015 | 7:44 am
    We have loved tuning in to Mary Tedesco, researcher on the latest season of “Genealogy Roadshow” on PBS, so we were thrilled to have had the opportunity to interview her.Mary, founder of Origins Italy shares how she was first introduced to family history, and it starts with a shared Ancestry.com login. And while we recognize the humor in that, it’s not recommended for privacy reasons.Mary went on to note how people can participate in the next season of “Genealogy Roadshow.” Tune in to learn how:
 
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    The Geneaholic

  • My Geneaholic Wednesday - 1 April 2015

    1 Apr 2015 | 10:10 pm
    I didn't play one April Fool prank today, and don't think I was pranked either.  Darn.*  Read email and blogs, and wrote Maggie's 100th Birthday - Post 353 for (Not So) Wordless Wednesday.  That was fun!  Answered email, added to the Best Of post, and checked Facebook.  Wasted an hour, I fear.*  Left at 11 a.m. for McDonalds for lunch, then to the library for John's group, and then the CVGS Bored meeting.  Dragged on until after 2.  The auditorium is not a good place for a Bored meeting! *  Home by 2:30 p.m., read email,…
  • My Non-Geneaholic Tuesday - 31 March 2015

    31 Mar 2015 | 9:59 pm
    This was a frustrating and fun day...*  Read email and blogs, and noted that Tuesday's Tip - Find FREE Genealogy Education Resources posted.  *  Received Isabella's email with photos, and put it into a word doc and sent it off to Lori and Lucas.*  We left at 10:15 a.m. for Linda's eye doctor appointment.  She was supposed to have a laser iridotomy but the doc said her eye moved too much and she aborted it.  Linda thinks she blinked.  So maybe next week?  We stopped at In n Out for lunch then home.  Home by 1 p.m.*  I read, added to…
  • My Geneaholic Monday - 30 March 2015

    30 Mar 2015 | 9:36 pm
    This was a pretty full genealogy day.  I finished my OASIS class today too.*  Read email and blogs, noted that Amanuensis Monday - Post 261: 1875 Probate Record of Frederick Sovereen of Windham, Ontario posted.  Got on the panel for Mondays With Myrt but could not be heard.  Drat, wonder what happened?*  Left at 9:30 a.m. for the OASIS class, had only 6 today, done at 12:30 and home by 1 p.m. for lunch.  Called by Roxanne about 3 p.m. saying the OASIS laptop was missing...oh boy.*  Noted that New or Updated Record Collections at…
  • My Semi-Genealogy Sunday - 29 March 2015

    29 Mar 2015 | 9:40 pm
    Two more days until we're one quarter through 2015.  Where does the time go?  The days just fly by.  It seems like the faster I go the behinder I get.*  Read email and blogs, and finished up the Best Of post.*  We left for church at 9:30 a.m., stopped at the store on the way home, and were home by 12:30 p.m.  Ate lunch, and watched NCAA Final 4 games.*  Online for a bit at 2 p.m. to note that Best of the Genea-Blogs -- 22 to 28 March 2015 posted.  Wrote two posts for later.*  Went in at 4 p.m. to watch the other NCAA game, then we ate…
  • My Geneaholic Saturday - 28 March 2015

    28 Mar 2015 | 9:53 pm
    I stayed home again today, a rarity for Saturdays!  Finally got a lot done on Pinterest.  And finished the income taxes (ouch!).*  Read email and blogs, noted that Surname Saturday -- ALLEN (England to colonial Massachusetts) posted.*  Worked in Pinterest - added two new boards and pinned a bunch to them.  Still a lot more to do.*  After lunch, noted that Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Newspaper Headline on Your Father's Birthday posted.  Worked on the income taxes, finalized, emailed off, and checks written to IRS and FTB.  A big…
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    Before My Time

  • 1924: Classical Music on the Montana Frontier

    30 Mar 2015 | 11:03 am
    Classically trained in Vienna, violinist / music teacher Gustave Foret attempted to start a music club in Baker, Montana, in 1924. It was announced in The Fallon County Times on January 10th:But on January 31st, this unfortunate announcement was made:Nevertheless, as Gustave stated, the show must go on. The program for an upcoming classical concert featuring Baker's own talent was published in The Fallon County Times on February 14, 1924:Reader, have you met me? I'm not a big fan of classical music. In college, I met my Humanities requirement with a 3-credit class called History of Rock &…
  • April 28, 1922: Treble Clef Concert

    28 Mar 2015 | 12:15 pm
    I expect to finish my current book project, News: A Krentz & Buss Family Album, within the next few days. The book is a collection of news stories about family members from the old weeklies of three places where my dad's side of the family had a strong presence in the early decades of the 1900s. I've been proofreading, a laborious chore which requires me to stop getting sucked into the news stories and keep my eye on spelling and punctuation while still paying enough attention to the content to know whether words have been accidentally omitted or in some other way messed up enough to…
  • 11 January 1923: Woman's Club Gives Party

    27 Mar 2015 | 11:12 am
    From The Fallon County Times, page 1:     The Baker Woman's Club gave the annual entertainment of husbands last Tuesday evening at a combined card and dancing party at the Hubbard's Hall. About one hundred people were present and twenty tables of Bridge and Five Hundred were played. Mesdames Yokley and McArthur superintended the card playing. High score prizes for bridge were awarded to Mrs. Comstock and H. S. Proctor, low score prizes were awarded to Mrs. Al Hansen and Chas. LaCross. High score prizes for 500 were awarded to Mrs. L. Wilson and Ped Akers, low score prizes…
  • Another Meeting of the Woman's Club

    16 Mar 2015 | 8:44 am
    My great aunt Emma McArthur was a participant in the program at the Baker Woman's Club meeting on March 29, 1924. The program was reportedly "much enjoyed by all" and was well detailed in the weekly paper so, dear reader, step into my time machine and let us get in on some of that Woman's Club action.Dateline: Baker, Montana — 3 April 1924 The Fallon County Times, p. 8:I believe "Tarantelle Mignon" was actually this very lovely piece by French composer Paul Taffanel, Grande Fantaisie sur Mignon, and I do hope the ladies of Baker enjoyed a performance much like this one:  Maybe Emma…
  • 8 March 1921, Baker, Montana: Judge Dousman Predicts the Past... er, the Future

    1 Mar 2015 | 1:06 pm
    Dateline: Baker, Montana — 10 March 1921 The Fallon County Times, p. 1, col. 1, below the fold:WOMAN'S CLUB MEETING TUESDAY     The Baker Woman's Club met Tuesday at 3 P. M., March 8th, Mrs. Marks presiding.     Plans were reported by committee for serving the dinner for the Farmers' Institute, Monday noon, March 14th, and also for the afternoon's entertainment by the Club.     After attending to other matters of business the Club enjoyed a good program.     Mrs. Zook gave interesting current events, especially…
 
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    oral history - Google News

  • Limited oral history of the Final Four-winning 1999-2000 Florida Gators ... - OnlyGators.com

    1 Apr 2015 | 6:10 pm
    OnlyGators.comLimited oral history of the Final Four-winning 1999-2000 Florida Gators OnlyGators.comExactly 15 years ago today, then-34-year-old head coach Billy Donovan led the Florida Gators to the first Final Four victory in program history. The 1999-2000 Gators were a special group, which included four NBA players (three of whom are still in the and more »
  • Return To The Scene: The Key Players Reflect On The Bloody Lawnmower ... - UPROXX (press release) (blog)

    1 Apr 2015 | 5:08 pm
    UPROXX (press release) (blog)Return To The Scene: The Key Players Reflect On The Bloody Lawnmower UPROXX (press release) (blog)The rest, as they say, is television history. Also in attendance were the higher-ups of Putnam, Powell, and Lowe, the British agency that had purchased Sterling Cooper the season before, including a promising young executive named Guy MacKendrick, who ...
  • New oral history takes insider look at Nirvana's early days - The Seattle Times

    1 Apr 2015 | 4:37 pm
    The Seattle TimesNew oral history takes insider look at Nirvana's early daysThe Seattle TimesPrevious oral histories such as Mark Yarm's “Everybody Loves Our Town” and Greg Prato's “Grunge Is Dead” focused on the members of big acts like Soundgarden and Pearl Jam. What makes Soulsby's book so interesting is that he unearths a hidden history ...
  • 'Every night, we were in the Polo Lounge, drinking Cristal' and other amazing ... - Business Insider

    1 Apr 2015 | 8:30 am
    Business Insider'Every night, we were in the Polo Lounge, drinking Cristal' and other amazing Business InsiderTwenty-five years after Drexel Burnham Lambert filed for bankruptcy, some alumni are getting together this week for a reunion in New York. So Bloomberg's Max Abelson, Jason Kelly, and David Carey put together an extensive, incredible oral history of Renegades of Junk: The Rise and Fall of the Drexel EmpireBloombergall 5 news articles »
  • Fat Men, Little Coats: The Oral History of Tommy Boy - Film School Rejects (blog)

    1 Apr 2015 | 1:21 am
    Film School Rejects (blog)Fat Men, Little Coats: The Oral History of Tommy BoyFilm School Rejects (blog)“To this day, people stop me on the street and say they love Tommy Boy. It's the ultimate movie for fifteen-year-old boys. And if you compare Tommy Boy to what they're making today for fifteen-year-old boys, it's the fucking Magnificent Ambersons David Spade Remembers Chris Farley on Tommy Boy's 20th AnniversaryVanity Fairall 111 news articles »
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    StoryCorps

  • StoryCorps 421: Beautiful Symmetry

    NPR
    30 Mar 2015 | 3:27 pm
    Jeff Wilson sits down with his former high-school classmate Tammie Baird to talk about accidentally hitting her with his car in 1984. Also in this episode: Remembering Susan Silverstone Darer. Music in this episode: "Fives," "Filaments," and "Sonstiges" by Podington Bear, "Agdam" by Hauschka, and "Send Off" by Explosions in the Sky & David Wingo.
  • StoryCorps 420: TED-time Stories

    NPR
    23 Mar 2015 | 1:42 pm
    StoryCorps founder Dave Isay is this year's TED Prize winner. Last week, he gave a TED talk in Vancouver. In this episode you'll hear part of that talk, as well as the stories he shared with the audience.
  • StoryCorps 419: I Shall Be Released

    NPR
    16 Mar 2015 | 2:11 pm
    Early in the morning of March 18, 1990, two thieves pulled off the biggest art heist in history at the Isabella Stuart Gardner museum in Boston. In this episode, we hear from the guard who mistakenly let them in. Music in this episode: "Logjam" and "Has Pluck" by Podington Bear, "I Shall Be Released" by Bob Dylan, and "Bees" by Caribou.
  • StoryCorps 418: Guardians of the Golden Gate

    NPR
    10 Mar 2015 | 9:14 am
    Two stories from San Francisco's iconic Golden Gate Bridge. First, we'll hear from two ironworkers who have spent more than 25 years on the bridge. Then, a young man who almost took his own life there speaks with the man who talked him down. Music in this episode: "The Gold Lining" by Broke For Free, "We're from Near and Far" by Ending Satellites, and "Fljótavík" by Sigur Rós.
  • StoryCorps 417: Remembering Wil Smith

    NPR
    6 Mar 2015 | 1:30 pm
    In this special episode, we're remembering StoryCorps participant Wil Smith, who recorded two interviews with his daughter, Olivia, and talked about being a single dad while attending college. Wil died last week after a long battle with cancer. Music in this episode: "Flax" and "Naruto and the End of the Broken Ear" by Fredrik from the album Flora.
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    Brooklyn Historical Society Blog

  • Photo of the Week: Pilgrim Laundry

    Tess Colwell
    1 Apr 2015 | 2:30 am
    [Female Laundry workers at Pilgrim Laundry], ca 1910, V1989.3.1; Pilgrim Laundry photographs, v1989.003; Brooklyn Historical Society.The photo of the week comes from the newly processed Pilgrim Laundry collection. Pictured above is one of the six black and white interior photographs from the collection. In this photograph, female workers are displayed using laundry machinery around 1910. Pilgrim laundry was a laundry facility located in the Windsor Terrace neighborhood of Brooklyn and first opened its doors in 1894. The owners set out to open a laundry business founded on the belief that if…
 
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    All about family!

  • 献立の立て方!簡単3ステップでもう夕食作りに悩まない!

    こっこ
    1 Apr 2015 | 5:12 pm
    最近、スーパーで買う食材が決まってきて、 作る料理がワンパターンになりがち・・(p_-) 食卓に並べた時の目新しさもないし、 いつも同じようなものばかりだと、栄養面も心配。 そう感じているあなたには、のがオススメ(^^)! ・・ただ、やみくもに立てるのでは、残念ながら意味がありません。 そこで今回は、についてです。 紹介する3ステップで献立を立てれば、 同じ食材でも、驚くほどが実現しますよ♪…
  • 1歳半~2歳の夕食献立メニュー⑤

    こっこ
    31 Mar 2015 | 6:03 pm
    1歳6ヶ月を過ぎると、大人が食べているものと同じものを欲しがるようになるので、 食事の用意が、グンと楽になりますよね。 ただ、まだ奥歯が生えていないので、丸のみを防ぐために、 調理には、もうひと手間必要。 野菜やお肉は、気持ちしたり、 1cm~1.5cmくらいの大きさに切ることで、 この時期のお料理の幅が、広がりますよ(*^_^*) 、という悩みも出てきますが、 それでもとにかく、。…
  • お風呂の天井から落ちてくる水滴にヒヤッ!防止するには?

    こっこ
    30 Mar 2015 | 9:07 pm
    気持ちよ~くお風呂に入っているときに、天井から冷たい水滴がポタッ・・! びっくりするし、せっかくの癒しの時間に、まさに水をさされて、 イライラっとしますよね(○`ε´○)! 今回は、そんなについてです。 お風呂の設備を見直す方法と、毎日のひと手間で防げる方法を、 紹介したいと思います。 お風呂の天井に水滴ができるのは、が原因。 湯船から出る湯気が上昇して、天井に付き、それが冷やされて水滴になります。…
  • お風呂場の天井カビ掃除!スルッと落とす方法はコレ!

    こっこ
    29 Mar 2015 | 8:42 pm
    お風呂場の天井に、生えてしまった。 毎日目に入るので、気にはなるものの、天井の掃除って億劫ですよね~(´・д・)-з また今度、また今度・・と思っているうちに、どんどん広がっていって・・・ そろそろ限界! (○0Д0)… なんて経験は、我が家だけではないはず!? 今回は、、 より安全なものを使って、を紹介したいと思います。 小さい子がいると、カビは衛生的にも心配。…
  • 手作り納豆の作り方!市販の納豆を使えば簡単♪

    こっこ
    7 Mar 2015 | 5:48 pm
    って、なんだかハードルが高そうなイメージがありますよね。 でも、大さじ2杯ほどの、市販の納豆があれば、 家庭でも簡単に、納豆を作ることができるんです(^^) 我が家は、子供も含めてみんな納豆が大好きで、 毎日のように食卓に出しているのですが、 1パックの量なんてあっという間になくなるし、パックのゴミも気になる・・ なら、作ろうじゃないの! と思い立って早5年。自家製納豆を作り続けています。…
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    Origin Hunters - Genetic Genealogist

  • Triangulated Small Segments are Identical by Descent

    19 Mar 2015 | 9:26 am
       Autosomal DNA segment matching is a complex issue.  Through testing and observation, it is obvious that some segment matches are false positives.  Computer algorithms will detect any matching allele with no knowledge that the allele is of paternal or maternal origin.   If we said that the left columns are from the father’s sides and the right from the mother’s, we would see that none of the columns match.  Obviously, we can’t just draw a line down the middle and say one side is the mother’s DNA.  To determine which DNA came from mm and which…
  • Press Release: Michael Maglio and OriginsConnector Launch Breakthrough Autosomal DNA Service

    6 Mar 2015 | 7:19 am
    OriginsConnector is an autosomal DNA service that can connect you to your distant ancestors between 10 and 14 generations ago.  Boston, MA - 6th Mar, 2015Autosomal DNA testing has become extremely popular for use within family history.  Major companies, including 23andMe, AncestryDNA and Family Tree DNA have tested nearly 2 million people.  Autosomal DNA is being used every day to find cousins, determine ethnicity and understand health factors.Typically, Autosomal DNA can be reliably analyzed to generate relationship matches only as far back as 5th to 6thcousins.  Michael…
  • Breaking Through the Autosomal DNA Generation Barrier: Connecting to Distant Ancestors

    5 Mar 2015 | 2:43 am
       There has been much debate over the use of small autosomal DNA segments.  It is important to understand where they come from and how they can be used for genetic genealogy.  Small segments are considered noise and false matches.  There are too many small matches to make sense out of, but they are not necessarily false matches.  These segments have been in the population for longer than we thought.  When I match someone at 2 cM it is very likely that they are a 12th cousin, not a 5th cousin.  There is no reason…
  • Before They Sailed: Mayflower DNA

    2 Feb 2015 | 3:42 pm
    Please share the details about this first of its kind book that will identify the DNA and trace the genetic ancestry of twenty families that sailed aboard the Mayflower. The story behind the story….Who were the Mayflower passengers before they were pilgrims? Where did they come from? England has a long history of migrations and invasions. Were the Pilgrim’s ancestors Anglo-Saxons, Normans or Vikings? This book will use traditional genealogy and DNA to answer those questions and more.The DNA of the Mayflower descendants will lead us on a path of discovery that will first allow us to…
  • Ghosts of DNA Past: Irish Kings

    28 Jan 2015 | 1:46 pm
       In 2006, Laoise T. Moore and the folks at Trinity College in Dublin published a paper famous for identifying the modal haplotype of Irish High King Niall of the Nine Hostages.  In their work, they used seventeen Y-DNA STR markers.  While time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) calculations have accuracy issues, having only 17 markers gives a common ancestor over 2,000 years ago.   What the Trinity folks really accomplished was the identification of Niall’s paternal ancestor from over 400 years earlier.  The media in 2006 had a field day in their…
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    Empty Nest Genealogy

  • Oxford University genetics study indicates a complex genetic ancestry of Americans.

    Christine Blythe
    30 Mar 2015 | 2:52 pm
    The University of Oxford has conducted a study of the “Complex genetic ancestry of Americans,” where the genes of North and South Americans with European and African representation were compared, and found the genetic links of the colonisation of the Americas and the slave trade.   Researchers involved in the study analysed over 4,000 DNA ...
  • MRSA remedy: Looking to the past can solve problems of the present and future.

    Christine Blythe
    30 Mar 2015 | 2:08 pm
    A surprising finding by Dr. Christina Lee of the University of Nottingham has been key to discovering that a medieval remedy used to treat eye infections has properties that could be useful today, as described in “AncientBiotics – a medieval remedy for modern day superbugs?”   The recipe for this remedy existed in an old ...
  • Questions raised about the legitimacy of the Plantagenet kings by DNA of Richard III.

    Christine Blythe
    30 Mar 2015 | 9:32 am
    It became known last year that an adulterous affair had broken the male line in Richard III’s family tree.   In attempts to answer the resulting questions, further genetic testing was done on the skeleton of Richard III, which had been found in 2012 under a parking lot in Leicester. More recent genetic testing was ...
  • Transcription – Acadia, Canada Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection) 1760-1946, Page 469

    Christine Blythe
    29 Mar 2015 | 7:05 am
    Original french text from Acadia, Canada Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection) 1760-1946, page 469.   CAP PELÉ CAP BOLD CTE WESTMORLAND NB PAROISSE STE-THÉRÈSE RÉGISTRES PHOTOGRAPHIES A LA PAROISSE 469 ———————- B    76 M. I. Florine Melanson Ce meme jour nous prêtre soussigné avons baptisé Marie Isabella Florine née hier du legitime mariage de ...
  • The Knowles Collection: Jewish genealogy database reaches 1 million entry milestone.

    Christine Blythe
    27 Mar 2015 | 3:06 pm
    The Knowles Collection, the Jewish genealogy database linking generations of Jewish families, has recently reached over 1 million entries.   Since it’s inception, this free searchable database at familysearch.org has been growing steadily at an average rate of about 10,000 individuals each month, including Jewish individuals from over 80 nations. Genealogy researchers are free to ...
 
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    blog.genealogybank.com

  • Bloody News: Battles of Lexington & Concord Begin April 1775

    Thomas Jay Kemp
    1 Apr 2015 | 9:07 am
    Bloody News: Battles of Lexington & Concord Begin April 1775 was originally published at .Stirring front page news – as gripping as a breaking news bulletin on television today Bloody News – This town has been in a continual alarm since Mid-day… the attack began at Lexington (about 12 miles from Boston) by the regular troops, the 18th Inft., before sunrise… From thence they proceeded to Concord where they made a general attack… New Hampshire Gazette and Historical Chronicle (Portsmouth, New Hampshire), 21 April 1775, page 1 The British had attacked: the Battles of Lexington and…
  • Pearls of Life Wisdom from Pink Mullaney’s Obituary

    Duncan Kuehn
    31 Mar 2015 | 8:23 am
    Pearls of Life Wisdom from Pink Mullaney’s Obituary was originally published at .Introduction: Duncan Kuehn is a professional genealogist with over eight years of client experience. She has worked on several well-known projects, such as “Who Do You Think You Are?” and researching President Barack Obama’s ancestry. In this blog post, Duncan shares some of the funny and at times insightful comments from the obituary of Mary “Pink” Mullaney about a life well-lived. Sometimes you read an obituary and mourn that you didn’t get a chance to know the person who died. Such is the case…
  • Virginia Archives: 147 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

    Tony Pettinato
    30 Mar 2015 | 8:44 am
    Virginia Archives: 147 Newspapers for Genealogy Research was originally published at .Virginia has long played a prominent role in American history. The first permanent English settlement in the New World was established in Virginia in 1607 (Jamestown), Virginia was one of the original 13 states that formed the United States, four of the nation’s first five presidents came from Virginia (George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and James Monroe), and the state’s current capital was once capital of the Confederate States of America (Richmond). Photo: a Virginia state welcome sign…
  • Great Advice from an Interview with a Very Old Man

    Thomas Jay Kemp
    27 Mar 2015 | 8:15 am
    Great Advice from an Interview with a Very Old Man was originally published at .I like newspaper articles where the oldest person in town is interviewed and gives their best advice for living well to an old age. They tell it as they lived it. Here is the advice Sam Cox (1819-1922) gave on his 102nd birthday as “he sat in his home yesterday afternoon smoking a cigar and shaking hands with those who called.” Sunday Herald (Boston, Massachusetts), 28 August 1921, page B1 He said: “…A man ought to live as long as he can and do all the good possible for his neighbors.” “Live…
  • Solve the Robert ‘Believe It or Not!’ Ripley Ancestry Brick Wall (Part II)

    Mary Harrell-Sesniak
    26 Mar 2015 | 9:02 am
    Solve the Robert ‘Believe It or Not!’ Ripley Ancestry Brick Wall (Part II) was originally published at .Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this blog article, Mary follows up on an article she wrote back in January 2013 and, thanks to helpful suggestions from some of her readers, tries to uncover more of the Robert Ripley genealogy mystery. Early in 2013, the GenealogyBank Blog published my article on Robert L. Ripley (see Solve the Robert ‘Believe It or Not!’ Ripley Ancestry Brick Wall), and – believe it or…
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    Radaris

  • Easter Mini-Infographic

    radaris
    30 Mar 2015 | 8:03 am
    Statistics show that Easter is the second biggest candy holiday in the United states, behind Halloween. They also indicate that Easter is celebrated by as many as 69% of Americans. With so many adults choosing to take part in this religious holiday, easter is a time to get together with family members, fellow churchgoers, and […]
  • How to Perfect Your Online Dating Profile

    radaris
    24 Mar 2015 | 9:05 am
    Perhaps the most challenging part of online dating in today’s day and age, is constructing your profile page. Many daters are finding this part of the online dating experience especially difficult because they don’t know what to write about themselves or what pictures they should upload to attract potential matches. On average, successful and attractive […]
  • 5 Spring-Cleaning Tips

    radaris
    20 Mar 2015 | 8:42 am
    After a long, difficult winter many Americans are celebrating the fact that March 20th marks the beginning of spring. As the season officially comes to a close, people are recalling the past few months that were filled with record-breaking snowfalls and bitter cold weather conditions, and looking forward to the much-needed thaw. For many, spring […]
  • 5 Ways to Parent Better With Online Resources Infographic

    radaris
    19 Mar 2015 | 9:08 am
    Parents today face many challenges, one of which happens to be the internet. With as many as 93% of children aged 12-17 jumping online, just as many parents are taking to the web to connect and protect their children. What many mothers and fathers are realizing as they learn more about the joys of being […]
  • How Important is Customer Service to your Online Reputation?

    radaris
    16 Mar 2015 | 8:44 am
    Customer service is so important not only to the business, but also to the customer. People want to be treated well and customer service is on the front lines of the customer experience. Most people hear of the customer service horror stories, and few share the good stories. Bad customer service can mean a loss […]
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    Researching Relatives

  • Family Clues in Birth Certificates

    Joanne Cowden
    1 Apr 2015 | 6:00 am
    Ancestry.com recently added a new collection: Pennsylvania birth certificates for the years 1906-1908. Although you may already know when and where an ancestor or relative was born, it's definitely worth your time to take a look at birth records.First, you could learn some fun facts. For instance, my grandmother Gertrude Francis Stenglein was actually named Gertrudt Francisca Stenglein on her birth certificate. Very German! Since her parents had only arrived in the U.S. in 1891 and still spoke German, this isn't a surprise but is still fun to see.Most importantly, you may learn more about the…
  • Genealogy & "Finding Elizabeth's Soldiers" Documentary

    Joanne Cowden
    30 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    Last week, my local PBS television station WQED aired an interesting documentary called Finding Elizabeth's Soldiers:"Elizabeth Black left a promising Pittsburgh art career to join American Red Cross efforts during World War II. She proposed a unique project to sketch hundreds of soldiers, sailors and airmen throughout Europe and send the treasured portraits to worried families back home - all across America.""This sequel explores efforts to find homes for dozens of soldiers' sketches found among the Pittsburgh artist's memorabilia. Through detailed research, detective work and the kindness…
  • The Pittsburgh Buildings of Henry W. Oliver

    Joanne Cowden
    27 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    The Henry W. Oliver Building, located in Pittsburgh's downtown business district, was completed in 1910. It was designated as a historic landmark in 1974. I worked in this building for 10 years and, while I still remember the slow elevators, I can appreciate it's history.Henry W. Oliver BuildingFrom Pittsburgh, How to See It, 1916According to probate records, Henry W. Oliver died on February 8, 1904. His will, which can be viewed on FamilySearch, indicates his wishes with respect to the erection of buildings in Pittsburgh:"Having in my lifetime offered to the City of Pittsburgh, a certain lot…
  • My Relative, a Catholic Nun

    Joanne Cowden
    25 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    On this day in 1884, my 2nd great-grandfather's sister, Margaretha "Maggie" Klein, entered the Order of St. Francis and then became known as Sister Genevieve. Her obituary contains some great details, so her order must have kept good records.Convent of Sisters of St. Francis, Millvale, PennsylvaniaFrom The Catholic Church in the United States of America, 1914Sister Genevieve outlived all of her siblings and died at the age of 85. She worked as a school teacher and then as a nurse at both St. Francis Hospital in Pittsburgh and New Castle Hospital in Lawrence County, Pennsylvania. Her obituary…
  • Include All Information in Research Requests

    Joanne Cowden
    23 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    Often due to distance or limited access to records, we must request research help from others. For example, you may choose to hire a professional genealogist to find information for you. Or, as is the case with the Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh, you may not be allowed to search through the archives yourself. You may have to fill out a form, and then volunteers will do their best to dig through the records in search of the information you need.In both instances, it's absolutely critical to provide as much information as you can so that the chances of success are greatly increased.  A…
 
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    Fold3 Blog| Fold3 Blog

  • Lee Surrenders to Grant: April 9, 1865

    Trevor
    1 Apr 2015 | 7:30 am
    On April 9, 1865, 150 years ago this month, Confederate general Robert E. Lee surrendered his Army of Northern Virginia to the Union’s Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, signaling the beginning of the end of the Civil War. After Lee’s hold on Richmond and Petersburg broke, he hoped to take his army to meet up with Joseph E. Johnston‘s troops. But things came to a head with the Union Army as Lee neared Appomattox Court House. On April 6, he lost 8,000 men to the Federals in engagements at Sailor’s (Sayler’s) Creek. Grant, aware that Lee’s…
  • 150th Anniversary (1865–2015) This Month in the Civil War: Disaster

    Trevor
    1 Apr 2015 | 7:00 am
    In the early morning of April 27, 1865, boilers on the steamboat SS Sultana exploded, killing more than a thousand recently released POWs in what is often called the worst maritime disaster in U.S. history. Toward the end of the Civil War, huge numbers of paroled military prisoners needed to be sent home, which was often done via steamboats with government contracts. Imprisoned Union soldiers at Cahaba (Alabama) and Andersonville (Georgia) prisons were sent to Camp Fisk, near Vicksburg, Mississippi, to be released. Because steamboat captains were paid per head, more than 2,000 of these…
  • Content Update: WWII Cadet Nursing Corps Card Files

    Trevor
    19 Mar 2015 | 7:00 am
    One new collection on Fold3 is the WWII Cadet Nursing Corps Card Files, which contains membership cards of women who joined the corps. The Cadet Nursing Corps was created in 1943 under the U.S. Public Health Service to help fill a growing need for nurses that had been compounded by World War II. Between 1943 and 1948 (the years the program ran), about 179,000 students between the ages of 17 and 35 joined the corps, with roughly 124,000 of them graduating. The program was federally funded, and the majority of nursing schools in the nation participated. The normal 36-month nursing program was…
  • Find: The Women’s Army Corps

    Trevor
    13 Mar 2015 | 7:00 am
    Did you know that Fold3 has a huge number of documents from World War II about the Women’s Army Corps (WAC), including hundreds of photos? If you’re not already familiar with the WAC, you might be surprised to find out just how versatile this group was during the war. The WAC was originally formed as the WAAC (Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps) in 1942 as an auxiliary to the Army, but in 1943 it was incorporated into that military branch and renamed the WAC. The goal of the WAC was to free up men for WWII combat by replacing them with women in noncombatant military jobs. The women of the WAC…
  • Spanish Flu Pandemic Begins: March 1918

    Trevor
    1 Mar 2015 | 7:30 am
    In early March 1918, soldiers with the flu began reporting to the infirmary at Camp Funston, an army training camp in Kansas. Within three weeks, 1,100 men at that camp had also come down with the flu. It was the start of a pandemic that would kill as many as 100 million people worldwide. Though commonly called the Spanish flu (because of a highly publicized outbreak in Spain), it likely began in Haskell, Kansas, where it spread to Camp Funston and from there to the rest of the world. Wartime conditions, like troop movements and overcrowded cantonments, accelerated and aggravated the spread…
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