Personal History - Genealogy

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  • Mar 1, Leonard Nimoy's Prosperous Garden Life

    Writing Your Life Story Blog
    1 Mar 2015 | 7:22 am
    Upon hearing the news Friday (February 27, 2015) that Leonard Nimoy had died I began contemplating writing a blog post. I'd grown up watching Star Trek. Nimoy played Spock, the half-human/half-Vulcan enigmatic and logical being with the remarkable eyebrow arch and calm in the face of galactic disaster disposition. But Nimoy was so much more than the actor who played Mr. Spock. He was sensitive, artistic and reflective.
  • A Grounding [TAP?] Root of the Tree of Life Writing

    The Heart and Craft of Life Writing
    25 Feb 2015 | 9:10 am
    Guest post by Denis Ledoux, founder of The Memoir Network.Just as with so many big projects in life, you’ll benefit by taking a moment to consider why you ought to start—or continue—to write this memoir of yours that is intriguing you and what role you anticipate it will play in your life.I like to think of my thoughts below as one of the roots of the Tree Of Life Writing that needs to be nurtured.You may not know it yet, but your impulse to write is probably solid.In late autumn of 1988, as people were hunkering down for another Maine winter, I was asked to read from my first…
  • Restoring Slave Families Using USCT Pension Records

    Ancestry Blog
    Linda Barnickel
    27 Feb 2015 | 6:30 am
    Today, we are going to look at how pension records created after the Civil War can help identify and reconnect slave-era families and relationships in the South. This article will assume that you have already identified someone in your family who may have served in the U.S. Colored Troops (USCT), and that you already have basic information, such as age or approximate birth year, state of residence or enlistment, and perhaps, regiment of service.If you have already obtained the soldier’s military service record, you have a good foundation. But don’t stop there. Riches abound in pension…
  • My Genealogy Saturday - 28 February 2015

    The Geneaholic
    28 Feb 2015 | 9:53 pm
    This was an all-genealogy day except for dinner out.*  Read email and blogs, and noted that Surname Saturday - CLARKE (England to colonial Massachusetts) posted.*  Left at 9:20 a.m. for Panera for the merger meeting with Diane, Dave and others.  Home by 12:15 p.m.*  Read, added to the Best Of and Blog compendium posts, checked Facebook, and wrote two posts for the CVGS blog.  Noted that Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- How Did You Meet Your Significant Other? posted.*  We left for dinner at 5 p.m. for Marie Callenders, home by 6:20 p.m. to…
  • Something in this book could kill you!

    Before My Time
    19 Feb 2015 | 3:14 pm
    Here's a very handy list for genealogists:Old Names for Illnesses and Causes of DeathA little over a hundred years ago, it occurred to someone that it would be useful to have a good set of standardized terms for these things. Thus a book was produced containing all the various sorts of deadly maladies. The link below will take you to a Google e-book. In the sidebar to the left of the book, there's a "search in this book" box where you can enter the cause of death from a death certificate. You'll see where that particular cause of death fits within the classification system. Fun with…
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    Writing Your Life Story Blog

  • Mar 1, Leonard Nimoy's Prosperous Garden Life

    1 Mar 2015 | 7:22 am
    Upon hearing the news Friday (February 27, 2015) that Leonard Nimoy had died I began contemplating writing a blog post. I'd grown up watching Star Trek. Nimoy played Spock, the half-human/half-Vulcan enigmatic and logical being with the remarkable eyebrow arch and calm in the face of galactic disaster disposition. But Nimoy was so much more than the actor who played Mr. Spock. He was sensitive, artistic and reflective.
  • Feb 27, Doing Something Everyday that Scares You

    27 Feb 2015 | 10:59 am
    A widely circulated quote, usually attributed to Eleanor Roosevelt, states that you should do something everyday that scares you. If you are writing a life story or memoir, this is terrific advice. Most of us want to skirt the dark and scary stuff of our past, but you shouldn't. Confronting the truth of your failures, mistakes, abuse, addictions and dark sides - whatever it is that you might not want to reveal - can often be really important material.
  • Feb 18, Ashes to #Ashtag and Making Your Mark

    18 Feb 2015 | 5:25 pm
    I got a few looks from people in the grocery store today.One woman realized pretty quickly that the black cross-shaped mark on my forehead wasn't because I was slipping on my hygiene. Not everyone is used to seeing people walking around with ashes on their forehead, even though signs of repentance are an ancient practice in many cultures. More people are discovering ashes on the forehead via social media with a slew of "ashtagged "selfies" showing up today on Instagram and Twitter.
  • Feb 12, A Woman Walks the Natchez Trail With Her Father (not her first choice)

    12 Feb 2015 | 6:13 pm
    Not Without My Father: One Woman's 444-Mile Walk of the Natchez Trail is not a history lesson, although the Natchez Trail was once a heavily traveled trail by foot, horseback and wagon and included the likes of Daniel Boone and Meriweather Lewis (of the Lewis and Clark expedition fame). Andra Watkins is the author of the above mentioned memoir. She wanted to become the first living person to walk the 444 miles, just as pioneers before her did. She would walk 15 miles a day. She couldn't find anyone to go with her except for her 80-year old father, who really didn't want to go along.
  • Feb 9, Memorable Family Feuds

    9 Feb 2015 | 4:40 pm
    Cowbird (a fascinating story-telling site) is currently partnering with Narratively, an online platform that shares untold human stories, on a seed for a storytelling project about family feuds. Funny, poignant, wild or unbelievable - they would like to hear from you if you have a story like this to share.
 
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    The Heart and Craft of Life Writing

  • A Grounding [TAP?] Root of the Tree of Life Writing

    25 Feb 2015 | 9:10 am
    Guest post by Denis Ledoux, founder of The Memoir Network.Just as with so many big projects in life, you’ll benefit by taking a moment to consider why you ought to start—or continue—to write this memoir of yours that is intriguing you and what role you anticipate it will play in your life.I like to think of my thoughts below as one of the roots of the Tree Of Life Writing that needs to be nurtured.You may not know it yet, but your impulse to write is probably solid.In late autumn of 1988, as people were hunkering down for another Maine winter, I was asked to read from my first…
  • To Finish or Bail?

    18 Feb 2015 | 6:01 am
    When do you bail out on a story? That’s not an easy decision for yourself, and even harder when someone asks for  your opinion. A couple of days ago, one of my writing buddies sent me an essay she’d planned to post on her blog, but wasn’t sure about. “Is this too boring? Should I post it?” I knew she’d struggled with that piece and put a lot of heart in it, but after a quick read, my answer was “No. Do not post this. It actually is boring, and here’s why.” Along with my reasons, framed as suggestions future stories and essays, I included the following personal…
  • Happy Blogiversary to Me

    9 Feb 2015 | 2:26 am
    It’s time to stop and celebrate nine years of blogging, 640 posts, (that’s a little over 70 per year), countless thousands of comments, and I have no idea how many hundreds of thousands of viewers from all over the world. But what are statistics among friends? I will point out one small thing derived from those stats: writing steadily, even a relatively small amount (word count average for posts is close t0 700), six times a month will add up to a pile of 650 stories over nine years. Even one story a month will add up to 108 stories in nine years. You can do the math. On the other hand,…
  • Boring or Brilliant?

    29 Jan 2015 | 1:57 pm
    The cliché of watching someone else’s home movies has always been “It’s always just a saddening bore.” What’s surprising is that the farther we find ourselves removed in time and place, the more these old films have the capacity to move us, to entertain us, or simply to remind us of life as it once was. From My Private Italy, Steve McCurdyAsk around and you’re bound to hear this sentiment about boredom expressed with regard to reading life stories written by “ordinary” people, especially strangers. You even hear it expressed by people about their own stories: “My life is so…
  • Writing About Friends

    22 Jan 2015 | 12:48 pm
    Sooner or later most of us want to write stories about people who are or were special to us. These stories may be free-standing tributes, or you may include friends as characters in memoir stories. Some such stories work better than others. In fact, as much as I hate to say this, some can be downright boring, the exact opposite of what we intend. The boring stories are generally limited to an account of things you did together, which makes the story more about your experience than the friend. While it’s perfectly fine to write about shared experiences, it takes more to define a…
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    Ancestry Blog

  • Restoring Slave Families Using USCT Pension Records

    Linda Barnickel
    27 Feb 2015 | 6:30 am
    Today, we are going to look at how pension records created after the Civil War can help identify and reconnect slave-era families and relationships in the South. This article will assume that you have already identified someone in your family who may have served in the U.S. Colored Troops (USCT), and that you already have basic information, such as age or approximate birth year, state of residence or enlistment, and perhaps, regiment of service.If you have already obtained the soldier’s military service record, you have a good foundation. But don’t stop there. Riches abound in pension…
  • Leaving a Legacy: Hedy Lamarr

    Lou Szucs
    26 Feb 2015 | 6:00 am
    From the Library of Congress Photo Collection, 1850-2002If you were asked who the most beautiful woman in the world is today, the names of Angelina Jolie, Kate Upton or Monica Bellucci might come to mind. In the 1940s, the person deemed to be “the” most beautiful woman in the world was Hedy Lamarr. The glamorous pin-up girl, who starred in dozens of American movies, got her start in a very risqué Czech film in 1933.Who knew her intellectual traits would outlast her Hollywood image and that one day she’d be inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame? With prophetic wisdom, she…
  • Leaving a Legacy: Ada Lovelace

    Anne Gillespie Mitchell
    25 Feb 2015 | 7:37 am
    You may have recently watched the Imitation Game and learned about Alan Turing’s efforts to defeat the Nazis with his ingenious computer work.  But do you know who is credited with creating the first computer program?  Would you have guessed an English Countess?Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace, born 1815 and died 1852 in England, is credited with creating the first computer program.She was baptized December 20, 1815 as Augusta Ada Byron, daughter of Lord George Gordon Byron and Anne Isabella (néeMilbanke) Byron.She married William Lord King, who subsequently became the Earl of…
  • Finding Your Family History on the Printed Page

    Ancestry Team
    24 Feb 2015 | 6:00 am
    Finding Your Family History on the Printed PageBy Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Lisa Elzey, Family Historian at AncestryI am stuck finding more information about my grandfather, Leland Wright. From a 1930 U.S. Census I know he lived in Florida and was born in Ohio about 1883. Can you help me? – EdmundIt’s a safe bet that you should always start with the United States census when you’re beginning the search for an American ancestor. The federal census, which actually was first taken in our young Republic in 1790 and then every ten years after that, can give you the nuts and bolts you need to…
  • Leaving a Legacy: Sojourner Truth

    Crista Cowan
    23 Feb 2015 | 9:15 am
    When learning about the lives of extraordinary individuals – whether it’s famous women in history or someone from my own family tree – I’m always curious about their childhood.  What experiences did they have that formed them into the human being they became.  What things did they see, what choices did they make in their formative years that allowed them to make more courageous choices later?Sojourner Truth, 1864.No life I have studied shows the connection between early life experience and later life choices more clearly than that of Sojourner Truth.Born into slavery…
 
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    The Geneaholic

  • My Genealogy Saturday - 28 February 2015

    28 Feb 2015 | 9:53 pm
    This was an all-genealogy day except for dinner out.*  Read email and blogs, and noted that Surname Saturday - CLARKE (England to colonial Massachusetts) posted.*  Left at 9:20 a.m. for Panera for the merger meeting with Diane, Dave and others.  Home by 12:15 p.m.*  Read, added to the Best Of and Blog compendium posts, checked Facebook, and wrote two posts for the CVGS blog.  Noted that Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- How Did You Meet Your Significant Other? posted.*  We left for dinner at 5 p.m. for Marie Callenders, home by 6:20 p.m. to…
  • My Geneaholic Friday - 27 February 2015

    27 Feb 2015 | 9:52 pm
    This was another stay-at-home day filled with research and writing.*  Read email and blogs, and added to the Best Of and RootsTech compendium posts.  Noted that 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks - Week 61: #68, Aaron Smith (1765-1841) posted.  Wrote More Information About MooseRoots.com and set it for later.*  Struggled to get a GEDCOM to work in Famberry, it finally did with Steve's help, and worked in it and wrote Trying Out the Famberry Family Tree.*  Answered email, checked Facebook, and wrote two Surname Saturday posts.*  Went in at 5:15 p.m.
  • My Genealogy Thursday - 26 February 2015

    26 Feb 2015 | 10:19 pm
    I stayed home and worked on genealogy things today...big surprise, huh?*  Read email and blogs, then wrote Treasure Chest Thursday - Post 251: 1777 Marriage Record of Zachariah Hildreth and Elizabeth Keyes in Townsend, Mass. and then did more in FamilySearch Family Tree before writing Fixing Online Family Trees - One Person at a Time on FamilySearch Family Tree and set it for later.*  Answered email, then watched some of the RootsTech videos and updated that blog post.  Added many photos and comments to my WDYTYA Story and sent it to myself and Lori.
  • My Genealogy Wednesday - 25 February 2015

    25 Feb 2015 | 9:55 pm
    Three more days in February?  Daylight Savings in 11 days?  Whoa.  Where did the winter go?Read email and blogs, wrote Randy's First Car -- Post 348 of (Not So) Wordless Wednesday.  Then wrote Fixing Online Family Trees - One Person at a Time on Geni.com and set it for later.*  Went off at 11 a.m. to McDonalds for lunch, then to the library to visit John's group and then the CVGS program meeting.  Barbara was an excellent presenter - lots of photos of San Ysidro and Tijuana River Valley.*  Home by 2:15 p.m. to water the yard and fold clothes,…
  • My Genealogy Tuesday - 24 February 2015

    24 Feb 2015 | 10:06 pm
    I had a headache most of the day until after my nap, still feeling tired.  Went to the doctor today for my regular visit.*  Read email and blogs, then wrote Tuesday's Tip: Listen to the Extreme Genes Podcast and Visit the Website.  *  Left at 10 a.m. for the medical center, saw the doc, everything going well, except when he asked me to breathe deeply I coughed after exhaling and he wants me to go to the pulmonary office for a breathing test.  Hmmm.*  Home by 11:15 a.m. to read, add to the Best Of and blog compendium posts, and worked a bit in Geni adding…
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    Before My Time

  • Something in this book could kill you!

    19 Feb 2015 | 3:14 pm
    Here's a very handy list for genealogists:Old Names for Illnesses and Causes of DeathA little over a hundred years ago, it occurred to someone that it would be useful to have a good set of standardized terms for these things. Thus a book was produced containing all the various sorts of deadly maladies. The link below will take you to a Google e-book. In the sidebar to the left of the book, there's a "search in this book" box where you can enter the cause of death from a death certificate. You'll see where that particular cause of death fits within the classification system. Fun with…
  • What if...?

    16 Feb 2015 | 12:46 pm
    When I bought The Genesis of the Memorial Day Holiday by Daniel Bellware and Richard Gardiner, I expected nothing more than to learn where our Memorial Day holiday came from and maybe impress friends and family with my ability to slip some fresh historical facts into my line of party chatter. Okay, I'm kidding about the party chatter. I'm lousy at party chatter and I avoid parties like the plague. I did, however, learn more than I would have thought possible about the origins of our Memorial Day holiday. It was only made an official U. S. holiday in 1971, for example, although its history…
  • Beginning with a Bang! My 2015 Genealogy Reading List

    8 Feb 2015 | 6:02 am
    I'm the kind of person who can spend whole days sitting at the computer doing research (more or less!) of a genealogical or family history nature. And although my interest began more than a quarter of a century ago, I've never run out of things to look up. I'm pretty sure I never will. But sometimes I just feel the need to step away from the computer and stretch out on the couch for awhile, so I'm always on the lookout for some good reading material with a genealogical theme. The recently-released Seeking John Campbell: Finding pioneers and patriots in the pampas by John Daffurn was a great…
  • Hey, don't blame me! They're not my cousins!

    4 Feb 2015 | 11:57 am
    At least I haven't proven yet that they're my cousins... although it looks like they might be... I'm talking about George, Nicholas, and Wilhelm, skeletons that were rattling in The Guardian's closet awhile back. Apparently the speed of sound is a little slow, bouncing across the briny sea and all, but I heard the rattling yesterday.Honestly, is there anything more intriguing than a multifaceted international family scandal? As a family historian, I was lured in, but what really hooked me was Miranda Carter's apparent enjoyment in telling tales on those royal badboys. For someone who hates to…
  • Handy Tools for German Research

    1 Feb 2015 | 11:05 pm
    German script alphabet chart ~ printable ~ This one is my favorite, showing Fractur (that cryptic-looking German typeface) and three different handwriting styles.  Larry O. Jensen's A Genealogical Handbook of German Research ~ All kinds of useful foundation information. For example, help with names and naming practices ~ see pages 19-21 and 39-43.German genealogical word list from FamilySearchGerman illness word list Rudy's List of Archaic Medical Terms ~ useful not only for German but also English terms ~ To access the German lists, just type "german" into the search box. Besides…
 
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    oral history - Google News

  • Golden Goal, 5 years later: Oral history of 2010 Vancouver Olympic hockey final - Yahoo Sports (blog)

    27 Feb 2015 | 2:52 pm
    Yahoo Sports (blog)Golden Goal, 5 years later: Oral history of 2010 Vancouver Olympic hockey finalYahoo Sports (blog)Athletes are conditioned to forget. Make a good play, think about the next one. Make a bad play, don't think about it and try to succeed the next time. Because of this, many of the specifics of the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Men's Hockey gold medal game and more »
  • Lafayette Gallery Hosts Event To Benefit Tibetan Oral History Project - Patch.com

    27 Feb 2015 | 11:08 am
    Patch.comLafayette Gallery Hosts Event To Benefit Tibetan Oral History ProjectPatch.comThis oral history endeavor in Nepal is urgent. The elders who can recount what Tibet was like before fleeing to Nepal after the Chinese invasion are now in their '70s, '80s and '90s. Their eyewitness accounts of Tibet's vibrant culture, unique
  • The Oral History of MTV's Rock N' Jock - Complex

    26 Feb 2015 | 12:19 pm
    ComplexThe Oral History of MTV's Rock N' JockComplexNostalgia doesn't always play well, but Rock N' Jock lasted for over a decade, marked an important shift for MTV, and was an important part of the network's history. Now on the 25-year anniversary of the first Softball Challenge, Complex looks back at The 10-man rotation, starring MTV's 'Rock N Jock,' all these years laterYahoo Sports (blog)all 3 news articles »
  • Vigilantes, 45s, and America: An Oral History of New York Hardcore's Best Kept ... - Noisey (blog)

    26 Feb 2015 | 9:21 am
    Vigilantes, 45s, and America: An Oral History of New York Hardcore's Best Kept Noisey (blog)Of all the bands from the late-80s NYHC scene who merely managed to squeak out a demo, Brooklyn's Altercation might be the most fabled and out-and-out kick-ass of them all. Made of members who would later join legendary bands such as Warzone and ...
  • College Park's Historical Committee is planning for more Oral History Nights - Orlando Sentinel

    25 Feb 2015 | 6:52 am
    College Park's Historical Committee is planning for more Oral History NightsOrlando SentinelThe Historical Committee is also staying busy working on several other ongoing projects, including documenting the business community on Edgewater Drive – past and present – so they can create a website that includes a detailed documentation of all ...
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    StoryCorps

  • StoryCorps 415: Lucky in So Many Ways

    NPR
    20 Feb 2015 | 3:58 pm
    Bill Jones, the first single man in California to successfully adopt a child, tells his friend Stu Maddux about his son, Aaron.Hear more stories at StoryCorps.org. Write to the participants at podcast@storycorps.org. Help support our work at StoryCorps.org/donate.Music in this episode:Ticking Away by Cranston Prelude No 1 by Chris Zabriskie 
  • StoryCorps 414: My Name is Yusor

    NPR
    13 Feb 2015 | 2:45 pm
    In May 2014, Yusor Abu-Salha–one of the victims of Tuesday’s shooting in Chapel Hill–recorded a StoryCorps interview with Mussarut Jabeen, who was her 3rd grade teacher. In fact, all three of the victims–Yusor, her husband, Deah Barakat, and her sister, Razan Abu-Salha–attended Jabeen’s school. Mussarut Jabeen returned recently to talk about Yusor’s death.Hear more stories at StoryCorps.org. Write to the participants at podcast@storycorps.org. Tell us about someone you want to interview at characters@storycorps.org. And help…
  • StoryCorps 413: When Sean Speaks

    NPR
    9 Feb 2015 | 11:45 am
    Sean Carter was a college student putting himself through school in Wichita Falls, Texas, when he was in a serious car accident. He was riding with a friend who had been drinking, and sustained a traumatic brain injury in the crash.Today, Sean is unable to walk and speaks only with the aid of a computer. At StoryCorps he interviewed his mother, Jenny Carter, who is his full-time caretaker. Hear more stories at StoryCorps.org. Write to the participants at podcast@storycorps.org. Tell us about someone you want to interview at characters@storycorps.org. And help support our work at…
  • StoryCorps 412: True Blue

    NPR
    3 Feb 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Shane Fairchild, a transgender man lived with his wife Blue Bauer, a transgender woman for almost 6 years.Blue transitioned when she was 54 years old. She and Shane met at a bar and were inseparable until Blue got lung cancer. She died on April 12, 2013.Shane sat down with their friend, Sayer Johnson in St. Louis to remember Blue. Hear more stories at StoryCorps.org. Write to the participants at podcast@storycorps.org. Tell us about someone you want to interview at characters@storycorps.org. And help support our work at StoryCorps.org/donate.Music Info: "Patience for…
  • StoryCorps 411: The Ballad of Wendell Scott

    NPR
    3 Feb 2015 | 11:58 am
    On January 30, 2015 Wendell Scott became the first African American driver to be inducted into the NASCAR Hall of Fame.Scott started racing in 1952 toward the end of the Jim Crow era, and was the first African American to win at NASCAR’s elite major league level.Scott’s family served as his racing team. They traveled to speedways together from their home in Danville, Virginia, and his sons worked as his pit crew.Wendell Scott died in 1990. One of his sons, Frank, and his grandson Warrick, sat down to remember him for StoryCorps.Hear more stories at StoryCorps.org. Write to…
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    Brooklyn Historical Society Blog

  • Photo of the Week: City Hall on Fire

    Tess Colwell
    25 Feb 2015 | 2:30 am
    [Brooklyn City Hall Tower Fire], 1895, V1981.15.132; Ralph Irving Lloyd lantern slides, 1981.15, Brooklyn Historical Society.This week marks the 120th anniversary of the 1895 fire at Brooklyn City Hall (today’s Borough Hall). This photograph displays a roof level view of the 1895 City Hall cupola burning.  If you look closely, you can see fire ladders propped against the building and firefighters on the roof using hoses to extinguish the fire. The fire started because of a lighted gas jet in a third floor closet. The fire left significant damage, destroying the clock and bell tower, as…
 
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    All about family!

  • キヌアの美味しい炊き方!お鍋で簡単ふっくらのコツは?

    こっこ
    27 Feb 2015 | 4:39 pm
    とっても栄養価の高い雑穀が、注目されて久しいですが、 その独特の味から、敬遠している人も多いと思います。 私も、雑穀デビューしたての頃は、そのから、 ちょっと遠慮がちだったのですが・・ を知ってからは、 そのプチプチ食感や味にハマり、ほぼ毎日のようにお料理に混ぜて使ってます(∩´∀`)∩ 実はキヌアは、炊くときのちょっとしたコツで、 クセやエグミがとれて、とっても美味しくなるんですよ♪…
  • 中華鍋で揚げ物をしたい!カラッと揚げるコツは?

    こっこ
    1 Feb 2015 | 2:19 pm
    は、「万能鍋」と言われるように、 焼く、煮る、蒸す、炒める、茹でる、そしてもちろん、 天ぷらやから揚げなどのにだって、バッチリ使えます。 実は、中華鍋は、 なんですよ。 普通の鍋よりも深さがあるので、油の量が少なくても揚げやすく、 さらに、鉄の中華鍋なら、揚げ物に使うことで、 鍋に油がどんどんなじみ、焦げ付きにくくなります。 ここでは、そんな について、みていきたいと思います。…
  • 中華鍋の振り方!2つのコツとは?動画でプロの手さばきを学ぼう!

    こっこ
    28 Jan 2015 | 2:11 pm
    プロの料理人が、って、 惚れ惚れしますよね~! 動画の最後の方は、チャーハンがまるで液体のように、 なめらかに空中を舞って・・・まさに こんな風にチャチャッと、 かっこよく鍋を振ってみたいですよね!(〃ノ∀`〃) もちろん、プロの料理人は、長年修行をしてこられたから、 ここまでできるわけなのですが、今回は、そんなプロの手さばきから学ぶ、 について、見て行きたいと思います。 家庭でも、と…
  • 中華鍋のお手入れ!さびちゃった時はどうする?これで完全復活!

    こっこ
    27 Jan 2015 | 4:43 am
    しばらく使っていなかった、中華鍋を出してみたら、 が・・! ∑(゚□゚;) ちゃんとお手入れして保管していたつもりだけど、 やっぱり鉄の中華鍋って、毎日使った方がいいのね~ ・・と、後悔しても後の祭り(T_T) 今日、中華鍋を使う予定なんだけど、 この錆、クレンザーで磨いて取っちゃっていいんだろうか? でも、下手に磨いたりすると、鍋が傷つきそうだし・・ どうしたらいい? って、あるのかな? 今回は、を、…
  • 中華鍋の正しいお手入れ方法!洗剤で洗っちゃいけないってホント?

    こっこ
    25 Jan 2015 | 2:00 pm
    って、お手入れが難しそうで、 とっつきにくい印象が、ありますよね。 確かに、すごく重いし、ちょっとお手入れを怠ると、 焦げ付いたり、錆びが発生したり・・┐(´~`;)┌  おまけに、 洗剤を使わずに、汚れがちゃんと落ちるの? って・・? せっかくの鉄の中華鍋を、大切に長く使うために、 今回はそんな疑問を、解決したいと思います。 最後に、洗剤で洗ってしまった時の対処法と、…
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    Video Biography Central

  • Dying in the Digital Age - And Staying Alive

    Jane Shafron
    21 Feb 2015 | 12:55 pm
    A memorial page on Flickr linked to from FacebookAs a video biographer and personal historian, I am a grateful fan of Facebook. It helps us connect and stay up with family and friends, provides a free repository for our photos and videos, and offers an increasing array of tools and ideas for creating and preserving our personal history, including something important just announced.Nowhere is Facebook more helpful than in tragic situations of death. When my good friend Peter died too young last year his family set up a Facebook "group" where we all shared stories, posted video, and uploaded…
  • Voice Over Narration in Life Story Videos: Yes or No?

    Jane Shafron
    8 Nov 2014 | 5:05 pm
    You're making a life story video - for a parent or a grandparent let's say. (Well done, by the way!) You are going to use video interview material of your subject, old photos and documents, and maybe some archive photos or archive video. You plan to divide the project into chapters. Are you going to use voice over?  Should you? The use of voice over in life story video or video biography projects is ultimately a personal choice. For many documentary purists, your story should be so well constructed - with plenty of "show me" footage - that you don't need "tell me" parts. "Leave the…
  • Courage, Generosity, Faith and Hidden History: Films for Non-Profits

    Jane Shafron
    17 Sep 2014 | 6:03 pm
    Films for non-profits – both in their creation and in their viewing - can be made the centerpiece for connecting to the donor community and for fundraising. They can be shown in exhibition spaces at one-off events (possibly as part of a well advertised "launch") or set up on screens as part of the permanent collection.A well planned and carefully made video can also be used on web-sites to educate and inspire visitors, and uploaded or linked to on social media to create interest and goodwill...A proven facility for story telling, experience with on-camera interviews, creativity in making…
  • Backing Up The Human Mind

    Jane Shafron
    2 Aug 2014 | 3:20 pm
    Getting ready for a summer vacation this year got me thinking: We back up the important data in our computers don't we? So why don't more of us back up our minds, or help the ones we love to back up their minds?  Is there any practical way to preserve something of ourselves - for the ones we leave behind - beyond disaster or death?Science has so far struggled with solutions, and much of what it has suggested is grisly, to say the least, and still very early in its stages of development.We know for example that a mouse, having eaten the brain of another mouse who has learned a maze, will…
  • 5 Things We Always Regret at the End

    Jane Shafron
    19 Apr 2014 | 3:46 pm
    What will you regret, at the end? An Australian palliative care nurse named Bronnie Ware worked for years with the dying; easing their passing after medicine had done all it could. Reflecting on the many patients she cared for, she came to see how much people grew when they were faced by their own mortality. "Every single patient found their peace before they departed, every one of them." She also noticed recurring themes when folks reflected on their lives, and pondered the things they regretted. Late in 2011, she decided to write a blog about the top 5 things she had observed people felt…
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    Origin Hunters - Genetic Genealogist

  • Before They Sailed: Mayflower DNA

    2 Feb 2015 | 3:42 pm
    Please share the details about this first of its kind book that will identify the DNA and trace the genetic ancestry of twenty families that sailed aboard the Mayflower. The story behind the story….Who were the Mayflower passengers before they were pilgrims? Where did they come from? England has a long history of migrations and invasions. Were the Pilgrim’s ancestors Anglo-Saxons, Normans or Vikings? This book will use traditional genealogy and DNA to answer those questions and more.The DNA of the Mayflower descendants will lead us on a path of discovery that will first allow us to…
  • Ghosts of DNA Past: Irish Kings

    28 Jan 2015 | 1:46 pm
       In 2006, Laoise T. Moore and the folks at Trinity College in Dublin published a paper famous for identifying the modal haplotype of Irish High King Niall of the Nine Hostages.  In their work, they used seventeen Y-DNA STR markers.  While time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) calculations have accuracy issues, having only 17 markers gives a common ancestor over 2,000 years ago.   What the Trinity folks really accomplished was the identification of Niall’s paternal ancestor from over 400 years earlier.  The media in 2006 had a field day in their…
  • Atrocities and Assimilation: Crusader DNA in the Near East

    8 Dec 2014 | 5:04 am
       This paper got its start back in February of this year while I was researching R1b-DF100 for my posting, The Third Brother.  Among the data, primarily Western European haplotypes, was a single Armenian record.  The R1b-L11>DF100 group that I was working with had as one of their theories that L11 was a fairly recent, 3,000 to 4,000 years, arrival from the Near East and that the Armenian record was part of that evidence.  I looked at the Armenian record, ran a phylogenetic test on it, the L11 group and some similar Near East records.  The Armenian record fell…
  • DNA Convergence and Chicken Little

    5 Dec 2014 | 4:04 am
       For me, the topic of convergence in yDNA first came up early in 2014.  I had just posted a paper and one of the comments was – “What about convergence?”  I said to myself, “What convergence?”  I admit I had to look up the topic.Convergence: A term used in genetic genealogy to describe the process whereby two different haplotypes mutate over time to become identical or near identical resulting in an accidental or coincidental match. - Turner A & Smolenyak M 2004.My response back to the comment was - “All of the haplotypes in my paper are…
  • DNA, SNP, STR, OMG!

    2 Dec 2014 | 2:09 pm
    (Originally published May 2014 in Going In-Depth)   Oh my gosh, there are many acronyms in genetic genealogy.  You have to agree that using the acronym DNA is better than writing deoxyribonucleic acid repeatedly.  Although, when we talk about using DNA for genealogy and we only use acronyms, they start to lose their meaning and become just another ‘thing’.  “Hey, I’ve got a SNP.  Do you have a SNP?”  “I dunno, let me check.”  Maybe I’m weird.  I like to understand what all the acronyms mean and how they play a part in the larger…
 
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    emptynestancestry.com

  • Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 27 Feb 2015.

    Christine Blythe
    27 Feb 2015 | 9:39 am
    Following are the most recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 27 Feb 2015. FamilySearch.org Argentina Argentina, National Census, 1895 Australia Australia, Tasmania, Miscellaneous Records, 1829-1961 Brazil Brazil, Pernambuco, Civil Registration, 1804-2014 Canada Canadian Headstones Ireland Ireland, 1841 and 1851 Census Search Forms Philippines Philippines, Civil Registration (Local), 1888-1983 Puerto Rico Puerto Rico, Civil […]
  • Remains of Blanch Mortimer, daughter of Sir Roger Mortimer found.

    Christine Blythe
    24 Feb 2015 | 3:19 pm
    I was surprised to read today that the remains of Blanch Mortimer, the daughter of Sir Roger Mortimer have been found. In a previous post, I described our genealogical relationship to Sir Roger Mortimer, outlining the most infamous aspects of his life, including his hanging at Tyburn Tree for treason. Blanch Mortimer, who died in 1347, was […]
  • Transcription: Biography of Jehu Burkett and Family

    Christine Blythe
    23 Feb 2015 | 7:39 am
    The following is a transcription of a biography of Jehu Burkett and his family, taken from the publication, “BURKHART — BURCKHARDT — BURKET — BURKETT.” lt has been said that Emanuel Burkhart whose home was in one of the Swiss Cantons, probably Berne, had two sons who came to America, sometime between 1742 and 1754. […]
  • An ancestral doppelganger is discovered!

    Christine Blythe
    21 Feb 2015 | 6:24 am
    My biggest fascination with my genealogy research is finding old photos of the people – especially any rare ancestral doppelganger to current family members. These images bring some life to the profile created by the fact finding of my research and brings these characters closer and makes them more relatable and understandable. A while ago, […]
  • FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 19 Feb 2015.

    Christine Blythe
    19 Feb 2015 | 11:43 am
    The following are the FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 19 Feb 2015.   FamilySearch.org Brazil Brazil, Pernambuco, Civil Registration, 1804-2014 Russia Russia, Lutheran Church Book Duplicates, 1833-1885 United States California, San Diego Passenger Lists, 1904-1952 Illinois, Soldier burial places, 1774-1974 Maine, Crew List Arriving at Eastport, 1949-1958 New York, Naturalization Index (Soundex), 1792-1906 […]
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    blog.genealogybank.com

  • John Adams & Thomas Jefferson: Intertwined in Life – and Death

    Duncan Kuehn
    27 Feb 2015 | 8:34 am
    John Adams & Thomas Jefferson: Intertwined in Life – and Death was originally published at .Introduction: Duncan Kuehn is a professional genealogist with over eight years of client experience. She has worked on several well-known projects, such as “Who Do You Think You Are?” and researching President Barack Obama’s ancestry. In this blog post, Duncan searches old newspapers to learn more about the remarkable coincidence of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson – friends and ex-presidents – both dying on 4 July 1826, the nation’s 50th anniversary. John Adams, the nation’s 2nd…
  • Remembering the Amazing Life of Maya Angelou

    Tony Pettinato
    26 Feb 2015 | 9:04 am
    Remembering the Amazing Life of Maya Angelou was originally published at .Calling someone a “Renaissance” person is an overused – and overblown – term these days. If a rock guitarist paints a portrait, the critics gush that he is a “Renaissance man.” However, America – and the whole world – truly did lose a Renaissance woman on 28 May 2014 when the remarkable Maya Angelou died. Born in poverty on 4 April 1926 in St. Louis, Angelou experienced and accomplished more in her 86 years than is almost imaginable. In alphabetical order, she was an: activist, actress, artist, author,…
  • His Life for His Son’s: The Story of My Cousin Isaac Smith

    Thomas Jay Kemp
    25 Feb 2015 | 8:26 am
    His Life for His Son’s: The Story of My Cousin Isaac Smith was originally published at .I recently found compelling newspaper articles about a local New York baker who lost his life while saving his drowning son. A distant cousin wrote me last week and mentioned that a mutual cousin of ours, Isaac Smith, had died while trying to rescue his son back in the 1800s. I thought, that sounds like a story that a newspaper would pick up – so I headed to GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives to find the rest of that story. I quickly found not one – but three articles on this tragedy.
  • Tamales: One of My Family’s Favorite Hispanic Foods

    Gena Philibert-Ortega
    24 Feb 2015 | 9:27 am
    Tamales: One of My Family’s Favorite Hispanic Foods was originally published at .Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this blog article, Gena searches old newspapers to find recipes for one of her family’s favorites: tamales. Every now and then my family goes out and purchase tamales to have for dinner. It’s one of those Hispanic food traditions we look forward to. While some families like ours purchase the tamales, others have a generational tradition of getting together and making dozens of tamales for family and…
  • World War II Japanese American Relocation Camp Newspapers

    Thomas Jay Kemp
    23 Feb 2015 | 8:56 am
    World War II Japanese American Relocation Camp Newspapers was originally published at .GenealogyBank has added newspapers published in the Japanese American Relocation Camps during World War II. Photo: Mochida family awaiting the evacuation bus. Source: National Archives photograph; Wikimedia Commons. Birth, Marriage and Death Notices These newspapers from Arkansas, California, Colorado and Utah contain birth, marriage, and death records that are very useful for genealogists to trace Japanese lineage. For example, here is an old obituary from the Tulean Dispatch for Hiromi Homanishi, who was…
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    Radaris

  • Renowned Children’s Author Reunited With Long-Lost Friend

    radaris
    27 Feb 2015 | 9:27 am
    Earlier this year Eric Carle, author of The Hungry Hungry Caterpillar, published a new book titled Friends. The subject of this short children book was a fictitious quest to find one of Carles own childhood friends from Syracuse NY whom he had lost touch with over 82 years ago. Eric had been searching for the […]
  • Community Mini-Infographic

    radaris
    24 Feb 2015 | 8:28 am
    In today’s day and age, the concept of community is constantly changing. As a result many families are finding it difficult to keep up with these alterations, resulting in a disconnect with their neighbors.   Studies indicate that over 68% of Americans want to know more about their community. They want to be more informed, […]
  • Know More About The Home You Plan On Buying

    radaris
    20 Feb 2015 | 9:42 am
    If you are thinking of buying a new home, or maybe just on the market for a new home, this list of first time home buyer mistakes could be an excellent resource. Doing your homework before buying a home is key to having a good experience in your new home. Researching things like the neighborhood, […]
  • Teen Sweethearts Reunited in Time for Valentines Day

    radaris
    13 Feb 2015 | 10:35 am
    Fondly called the most romantic day of the year by a majority of Americans, February 14th is celebrated by 62% of adults across the nation. On average we spend over $18.6 billion on Valentine’s Day to buy flowers, chocolates, dinner, and gifts all to show how much we care for and love our significant others. […]
  • Philly Man Gets 15 to 30 for Contractor Fraud

    radaris
    11 Feb 2015 | 10:37 am
    In Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, a local contractor has been sentenced in a case where he was suspected of defrauding a dozen clients out of an estimated $2 Million dollars. John Succi was sentenced to 15 to 30 years in a state prison after being found guilty. By doing more research on the people you hire to […]
 
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    Researching Relatives

  • Family Marriage: Wedding at St. Stephanus, Lambsheim, Germany

    Joanne Cowden
    27 Feb 2015 | 6:30 am
    On this day in 1838, my 3rd great-grandparents were married in St. Stephanus Catholic Church in Lambsheim, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany.Courtesy of Wikipedia: St. Stephanus in Lambsheim, GermanyJohn Rüttger was 40 years old and Elisabeth Carolina Armbrust was 27 when they exchanged their vows in the church pictured above. As far as I can tell, they became the parents of two daughters and two sons. Eight years after their wedding, the family boarded a ship and headed to their new life in America. My 2nd great-grandmother, Anna Mary Rüttger, was only four years old.Unfortunately, I haven't…
  • Gather Clues from Geneanet

    Joanne Cowden
    25 Feb 2015 | 6:30 am
    One of the websites I like to turn to when I get stuck with my genealogy research is Geneanet. The European family trees there--in fact, the family trees on many websites--can give you some great clues to locating a possible town or names of parents for an ancestor. I consider them to be clues only because most of the trees don't provide sources to back up the information.For example, I recently learned from church marriage records (which I'll write about in a future post) that the names of my 4th great-grandparents are Clemens Steimer and Barbara Eid of Wiesbach, Germany. I know I just…
  • Pittsburgh Female College

    Joanne Cowden
    23 Feb 2015 | 6:00 am
    The Pittsburgh Female College was established in the mid-1850s in the Wilkinsburg area of the city. According to the Annals of Old Wilkinsburg and Vicinity, the college "had a fine class of students--boarders coming from many states in the union--as far west as California and from Minnesota to Texas. The day pupils came from the best families in Pittsburgh and its suburbs." The building pictured below burned in 1891 and was not rebuilt.Directory of Pittsburgh and Allegheny Cities, 1863
  • Our Ancestors' Weather

    Joanne Cowden
    20 Feb 2015 | 7:00 am
    With some of us dealing with unusually cold temperatures (-11F this morning south of Pittsburgh!), I thought it would be appropriate to post this 1912 article that I found on Newspapers.com:The Daily Notes (Canonsburg, PA), January 13, 1912"With thermometers standing at from 16 to 20 degrees below zero, the mercury Saturday morning registered the lowest in thirteen years. Last evening the temperature marked a few degrees above zero, and the Pittsburg weather office promised a minimum temperature for the night of about five below zero. But there was a steady lowering of the temperature during…
  • Family Birth: Mary Klein, Unwed Mother

    Joanne Cowden
    18 Feb 2015 | 7:00 am
    My 3rd great-aunt was born today in 1858. She was the first daughter of Peter & Barbara Steimer Klein, who had arrived in America three years earlier. By the time she was 20, she had lived in the Pittsburgh neighborhoods of McKeesport, Versailles, and Lower St. Clair.Mary never married and died at the age of 57 of an intestinal obstruction due to ovarian cancer. For the last 10 years of her life, she lived with her brother Andrew and his wife Magdalena Koenig Klein. I can only imagine that she was a loving aunt to her young nephew Walter.Hier Ruht In Gott (Here Rests in God) Mary Klein,…
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    Forces War Records Blog

  • Our WW1 Medical Records collection tops 100,000 names!

    24 Feb 2015 | 8:00 am
    Forces War Records has now transcribed a grand 100,000 records from the ‘Military Hospitals Admissions and Discharge Registers WW1 collection. Read on to find out more about a doctor’s life on the Western Front.
  • Heroism runs in families; Victoria Crosses awarded to relatives, 70 years apart

    26 Feb 2015 | 7:50 am
    With just 1,357 of the famous bronze crosses having been awarded in history, to 1,354 recipients, the chances of two of them coming from the same family are not good. However, the Leakeys can boast just such a distinction.
  • Verdun – not the bloodiest, but the most gruelling battle of WW1

    20 Feb 2015 | 5:18 am
    On 21st February 1916, 99 years ago tomorrow, the Germans began their attempt to ‘bleed the French white’. Though the resulting epic battle kept 2/3 of the French army busy, it would ultimately end in a stalemate.
  • An Uprising Crushed

    18 Feb 2015 | 12:50 am
    As a Polish hero who saw his village invaded, joined the Resistance and escaped a concentration camp dies, aged 88, we bring you the tragic story of Warsaw’s war.
  • “Fortress Singapore” falls

    10 Feb 2015 | 8:07 am
    A major naval port, and the stronghold of the British Empire in South East Asia, it seemed impossible that Singapore could fall into Japanese hands; but Britain had underestimated both the resources and determination of wily Japan.
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    Fold3 Blog| Fold3 Blog

  • Spanish Flu Pandemic Begins: March 1918

    Trevor
    1 Mar 2015 | 7:30 am
    In early March 1918, soldiers with the flu began reporting to the infirmary at Camp Funston, an army training camp in Kansas. Within three weeks, 1,100 men at that camp had also come down with the flu. It was the start of a pandemic that would kill as many as 100 million people worldwide. Though commonly called the Spanish flu (because of a highly publicized outbreak in Spain), it likely began in Haskell, Kansas, where it spread to Camp Funston and from there to the rest of the world. Wartime conditions, like troop movements and overcrowded cantonments, accelerated and aggravated the spread…
  • 150th Anniversary (1865–2015) This Month in the Civil War: Battle of Waynesboro

    Trevor
    1 Mar 2015 | 7:00 am
    On March 2, 1865, Philip Sheridan‘s Union troops under the command of George A. Custer defeated Jubal Early‘s Confederate force at Waynesboro, Virginia, ending the last Confederate threat in the Shenandoah Valley. Both armies had been wintering in the Shenandoah Valley after a series of Union victories that had hit Early’s troops hard. In February, Sheridan received word from U. S. Grant to take his 10,000 men and capture Lynchburg and then meet up with W. T. Sherman‘s forces in North Carolina. However, before he left, Sheridan decided to finish up what was left of…
  • South Carolina Estate Inventories and Bills of Sale, 1732-1872

    Trevor
    20 Feb 2015 | 9:00 am
    Part of Fold3’s Black History Collection is the South Carolina Estate Inventories and Bills of Sale, 1732-1872. Like the title suggests, this item contains bills of sale, inventory and appraisement books, and inventories of estates from the Charleston area of South Carolina between 1732 and 1872. It is a joint project with the South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Family Search, and the Lowcountry Africana group. Among other uses, this publication can be invaluable for tracking down African American ancestors in the Charleston area, especially if they were slaves. Because…
  • 150th Anniversary (1865–2015) This Month in the Civil War: Burning of Columbia, SC

    Trevor
    10 Feb 2015 | 7:00 am
    After General Sherman’s destructive march through Georgia at the end of 1864, he turned his army north to the Carolinas. When they reached Columbia, the capital of South Carolina, in mid-February 1865, the Union troops found the Confederates forces already evacuating. According to Sherman, there was no plan to burn Columbia, aside from destroying strategic locations such as public buildings, railroad depots, and factories. Apparently, when his occupying soldiers entered the city, they found the Confederates had left bales of cotton burning in the city streets, which—when combined…
  • 200 years ago the War of 1812 Ended

    Trevor
    4 Feb 2015 | 4:00 pm
    This month marks the 200th anniversary of the end of the War of 1812. The hostilities formally ended on February 17, 1815, at 11 p.m., when President Madison exchanged ratification documents for the Treaty of Ghent with a British representative. Although both countries had been exploring the possibility of peace since almost the beginning of the war, official peace negotiations didn’t begin until August 1814 in Ghent, Belgium. The American delegation was made up of some of the best America had to offer: John Quincy Adams, Henry Clay, Albert Gallatin, Jonathan Russell, and James A.
 
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