Personal History - Genealogy

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  • May 20, Me at Twenty

    Writing Your Life Story Blog
    19 May 2015 | 9:00 pm
    39 years ago I was twenty; young, idealistic and exploring my new world of personal independence. I was a college student in 1976, attending the University of Oklahoma, mostly because I really liked it when I visited with my Dad my junior year in High School. The campus was lively. There were pretty girls, good music and it was a major University. Not Ivy League by any stretch, but it was far away from home and that was important to me at the time.
  • Monkeys, Jackasses and Wispy Mist

    The Heart and Craft of Life Writing
    21 May 2015 | 12:39 pm
    In her blog post, “Jackasses & Monkeys – Inner demons of writing,” Carol Bodensteiner reveals that her inner writing demons take the form of monkeys. She expresses relief on learning that others, such as Kimberly  Brock, have similar problems. In my opinion, Kimberly’s challenge is worse. She is beset by Jackasses.Carol invited readers to share their experiences. I also have demons, as I believe we all do. Like Carol, I battle monkeys, described by Zen masters as Monkey Mind. My monkeys are different from Carol’s. Mine swing through the trees at random, taking my thoughts…
  • Records from the Jersey Archive in the Channel Islands go online for the first time.

    Ancestry Blog
    Brian Gallagher
    22 May 2015 | 4:42 am
     We are very excited to bring you two new collections as part of our web search initiative. The Jersey, Channel Islands, Wills and Testaments collection covering the years 1663-1948 and The Jersey, Channel Islands, Occupation Registration Cards from World War Two covering the years 1940-1945. Both these collections will be of enormous benefit to anyone who is eager to learn more about their Jersey family history. Some of the most common surnames found in these collections include, De Gruchy, Renouf, Hamon, Amy, Bisson, Querée, Le Brocq, Le Marquand, Le Cornu, and De La Haye.  It is…
  • My Genealogy Weekend - 23 and 24 May 2015

    The Geneaholic
    24 May 2015 | 10:09 pm
    I made some genealogy progress this weekend, but didn't spend much time on genealogy.1)  Saturday, 23 May 2015:*  Read email and blogs, and noticed that Surname Saturday -- CLARK (England to colonial New England) posted.  Wrote Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- Your Visited States/Provinces Map and set it for later.*  Left at 9:30 a.m. for the FamilySearch Library in Mission Valley, and easily found the Morley records in the Lancashire Quarter Sessions.  Tried to email them to my Gmail account but it didn't work.  Went to the RootsMagic class,…
  • College Of New Jersey Creates Oral History Archive Of Superstorm Sandy Victims - CBS Local

    oral history - Google News
    24 May 2015 | 6:30 pm
    CBS LocalCollege Of New Jersey Creates Oral History Archive Of Superstorm Sandy VictimsCBS LocalTRENTON, N.J. (CBSNewYork) — College of New Jersey Associate Professor Matthew Bender and his students are archiving the oral histories of victims of Superstorm Sandy. “I think they provide a really good way for people in the future to look back and Powerful stories: TCNJ launches Hurricane Sandy projectNJ.comall 2 news articles »
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    Writing Your Life Story Blog

  • May 20, Me at Twenty

    19 May 2015 | 9:00 pm
    39 years ago I was twenty; young, idealistic and exploring my new world of personal independence. I was a college student in 1976, attending the University of Oklahoma, mostly because I really liked it when I visited with my Dad my junior year in High School. The campus was lively. There were pretty girls, good music and it was a major University. Not Ivy League by any stretch, but it was far away from home and that was important to me at the time.
  • May 18, Be Aware! May is Personal History Awareness Month

    18 May 2015 | 5:30 pm
    There is still plenty to celebrate about personal history in this month we like to refer to as Personal History Awareness Month. This month an excellent post by Sarah White, current President of the Association of Personal Historians, focuses not just on the importance of personal history and life story preservation, she emphasizes the importance of Personal History AWARENESS!
  • May 14, Throwback Thursday - My Son Walks the Graduation Line

    14 May 2015 | 4:58 pm
    Three years ago to the day my son Eric graduated from High School. I wrote about it on this blog and found myself ruminating about the significance of High School graduation. It is special on many levels. By extension, you can consider any graduation an important milestone and ending-leads-to-new-beginning.
  • May 13, William Zinsser Wrote and Lived Well

    13 May 2015 | 5:14 pm
    William Zinsser, a terrific writing instructor and gifted writer, died Tuesday at the age of 92. His book Writing Well has sold over 1.5 million copies and has bee revised a few times (just as any good writing should). I've always enjoyed reading his advice and "hearing" his voice through the written word. Supposedly it took him until his 50's to truly find his voice.
  • May 10, Mom's Best Cooking Isn't Always A Meal

    10 May 2015 | 5:52 pm
    Mom's typically are the family chefs, although many men also enjoy preparing meals. A New York Times article from May 5, A Mother's Cookbook Shares More Than Recipes has the author, Kim Severson, reminiscing about her mom's recipes and old cookbooks.
 
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    The Heart and Craft of Life Writing

  • Monkeys, Jackasses and Wispy Mist

    21 May 2015 | 12:39 pm
    In her blog post, “Jackasses & Monkeys – Inner demons of writing,” Carol Bodensteiner reveals that her inner writing demons take the form of monkeys. She expresses relief on learning that others, such as Kimberly  Brock, have similar problems. In my opinion, Kimberly’s challenge is worse. She is beset by Jackasses.Carol invited readers to share their experiences. I also have demons, as I believe we all do. Like Carol, I battle monkeys, described by Zen masters as Monkey Mind. My monkeys are different from Carol’s. Mine swing through the trees at random, taking my thoughts…
  • “I Could Write About My Sex Life”

    9 May 2015 | 3:13 pm
    Soon after I began teaching lifestory writing, I met with a man I knew only slightly, I’ll call him Sam. Sam wanted my advice on how to write his lifestory. I was several years short of sixty,  and this crumpling man in his late eighties. As usual, I suggested he start with a story idea list and asked him what he might want to write about. I sat patiently for what seemed like an hour while he sat silently, slumped in his chair and lost in thought. Suddenly he seemed suffused with high noon sunshine as his head lifted. A huge smile spread across his pallid, wrinkled face. “I could…
  • Seven Secrets about Writing

    29 Apr 2015 | 8:14 am
    Ian Mathie, my Scottish/African writing buddy, recently tagged me on Facebook to share seven secrets about writing. I accept this challenge as great sport, and following Janet Givens’ example in her response to Ian, I’m  posting my reply here as the path to Facebook. Secret #1: Writing is fun! That is, it’s fun if you write about happy memories and ideas and send your inner critic to her room. Write with color. Write outside your usual boundaries. Write with attitude and guts. More guidelines here.Secret #2: Writing can be painful.Dark memories can be searing to write about when…
  • I Want My Grandchildren to Know I Wasn’t Always Old

    21 Apr 2015 | 6:00 am
    I watched as an old woman entered the room, leaning heavily on her cane. Although each step seemed to be a huge effort, her sagging figure was elegantly dressed, and her face, a road map of wrinkles, tastefully made up. She sat heavily in a seat near the door, in the front row, not far from where I stood, waiting to present a book talk about The Heart and Craft of Lifestory Writing. I begin these programs by asking everyone why they are interested in writing their lifestories. I get a variety of predictable responses: “I have a few memories I want to write down for my kids” ... “I do…
  • Ritergal’s Birthday

    1 Apr 2015 | 8:53 am
    Heavens to Betsy, today is Ritergal’s birthday, and  I just realized she is a teenager, In fact, she has been a teenager for a couple of years. That could explain a lot of things, but I won’t go into that. In honor of her birthday, she’s my guest today, sharing her flash memoir, previously unread and unedited by me:That woman, the one whose fingers I’m using, thinks I’m only fifteen, and she thinks she calls the shots. Little does she know. I’m ageless. For several decades I lurked in a hidden closet of her soul, just beyond her awareness, waiting for the right moment to make…
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    Ancestry Blog

  • Records from the Jersey Archive in the Channel Islands go online for the first time.

    Brian Gallagher
    22 May 2015 | 4:42 am
     We are very excited to bring you two new collections as part of our web search initiative. The Jersey, Channel Islands, Wills and Testaments collection covering the years 1663-1948 and The Jersey, Channel Islands, Occupation Registration Cards from World War Two covering the years 1940-1945. Both these collections will be of enormous benefit to anyone who is eager to learn more about their Jersey family history. Some of the most common surnames found in these collections include, De Gruchy, Renouf, Hamon, Amy, Bisson, Querée, Le Brocq, Le Marquand, Le Cornu, and De La Haye.  It is…
  • How Corsets Evolved in 1800s-1900s Women’s Fashion

    Betty Shubert
    21 May 2015 | 5:00 am
    We are fast approaching the summer season, which means shorts, ,and sandals. But you may not know that no matter the season, some of our female ancestors had to wear tightly laced corsets, numerous petticoats, hoops, and later bustles, all before modern air conditioning. Can you imagine?I’m reminded of the scene in Gone With the Wind in which Scarlett O’Hara and all the lady guests retreated in mid-afternoon to loosen their corsets and rest before dressing again for the evening. (Perhaps that’s where the expression “Let’s take a breather” originated.)To better…
  • Where’s William? Finding New Clues in Old Evidence

    Ancestry Team
    20 May 2015 | 6:00 am
    By Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Loretto Dennis Szucs, Ancestry.com GenealogistI have been researching my husband’s family and have hit a roadblock. His great-great-great grandfather, William Weikert, came to America from Germany and settled in a community about 30 miles from us. I know he was born September 1817. I have a copy of his naturalization record; however, the writing is difficult to read and at the time he was naturalized, no supporting documents were required, such as affidavits or family history. I don’t know where to go from here, since it’s difficult to read the area in…
  • Who will survive the Victorian Workhouse? The final episode of 24 Hours in The Past airs tonight at 9pm on BBC One.

    Brian Gallagher
    19 May 2015 | 10:27 am
    The final and most challenging episode yet of 24 Hours in The Past sees six celebrities destitute and penniless in Victorian Britain. With no break since they were sacked from the potteries, they now have no food or shelter. In Victorian Britain that meant only one thing – the workhouse.They are stripped of their belongings and their identities. Left wearing the workhouse uniforms and rough wooden shoes, the workhouse inmates are forced to work harder than they thought possible. It is a world of relentless punishment where the workhouse master deals harshly with anyone who breaks the…
  • ABC’s of Commonly Used Nicknames (Q-Z)

    Jessica Murray
    19 May 2015 | 9:00 am
    Over the last few months, we ran a series of blog posts that highlighted nicknames or alternate first names your ancestors may have used. We’ve all seen at least one ancestor referred to by a nickname in a public record. Before you throw in the towel on that ancestor who has been eluding you, consider that he or she may have been using a a nickname or spelling reflective of their homeland, rather than the first name you’re expecting.Today is the last in the series and features first names starting with letters Q-Z, although we were hard pressed to find any first names along with…
 
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    The Geneaholic

  • My Genealogy Weekend - 23 and 24 May 2015

    24 May 2015 | 10:09 pm
    I made some genealogy progress this weekend, but didn't spend much time on genealogy.1)  Saturday, 23 May 2015:*  Read email and blogs, and noticed that Surname Saturday -- CLARK (England to colonial New England) posted.  Wrote Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- Your Visited States/Provinces Map and set it for later.*  Left at 9:30 a.m. for the FamilySearch Library in Mission Valley, and easily found the Morley records in the Lancashire Quarter Sessions.  Tried to email them to my Gmail account but it didn't work.  Went to the RootsMagic class,…
  • My Geneaholic Friday - 22 May 2015

    22 May 2015 | 10:07 pm
    This was another stay-at-home day, and wasn't overly exciting.  Padres lost again, too.*  Read email and blogs, then wrote 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks - Week 73: #88 Humphrey White (1757-1814).  Researched and wrote First Look at SCGS Genealogy Jamboree 2015 Mobile App and set it for later.*  Worked on the probate presentation for CVGS, and added several more charts.  Answered email, added to the Best Of and NGS posts.  Wrote the SDGC blog post for CVGS programs.*  Watched several YouTube videos by Pat and Russ, then two from Ancestry.com.*…
  • My Genealogy Thursday - 21 May 2015

    21 May 2015 | 10:14 pm
    Lunch and the Padres game interrupted an all-genealogy day...so it wasn't.*  Read email and blogs, then wrote Treasure Chest Thursday - Post 263: 1798 Pennsylvania Direct Tax List for Rudolf Spangler in York, Penn.*  Answered email, added to the Best Of and NGS blogs, and checked my Ancestry Hints.*  Left at 10:45 a.m. for lunch with the Rohr engineers - only 9 of us, and home by 12:45 p.m.*  Researched and wrote Refreshing My Database Using the 52 Ancestors Weekly Theme.  Took a 30 minute nap, then online at 2:30 p.m. to read, update the NGS blog, and check…
  • My Geneaholic Wednesday - 20 May 2015

    20 May 2015 | 10:48 pm
    This was an all-genealogy day, except for the nap, until the evening.  Didn't sleep well last night...*  Read email and blogs, and wrote The Seaver-Hildreth Gravestone in Leominster, Mass. -- Post 360 of (Not So) Wordless Wednesday and then SCGS Genealogy Jamboree is June 4-7, 2015 in Burbank and set it for late morning.  Downloaded the Jamboree app. *  Went off at 11 a.m. to McDonalds for lunch, then the bank, and the library.  Sat in on John's group for awhile, then to the CVGS Computer Group which was boring.  Felt tired, home at 1…
  • My Geneaholic Tuesday - 19 May 2015

    19 May 2015 | 10:18 pm
    This was an all genealogy day until the evening and the Padres game. *  Read email and blogs, and wrote Tuesday's Tip: Review Your Ancestry Member Trees Hints Every Day.  Added some of today's Hints to the database.*  Answered email, added to the Best Of and NGS posts.  Wrote an email for the CVGS Chumps meeting.  Checked Facebook.*  After lunch, worked a bit in Relative Finder again.  Looked at FamilySearch learning courses too. *  Researched and wrote Mea Culpa - The Ranslow Smith House in Jefferson County, New York.  Went in and…
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    oral history - Google News

  • College Of New Jersey Creates Oral History Archive Of Superstorm Sandy Victims - CBS Local

    24 May 2015 | 6:30 pm
    CBS LocalCollege Of New Jersey Creates Oral History Archive Of Superstorm Sandy VictimsCBS LocalTRENTON, N.J. (CBSNewYork) — College of New Jersey Associate Professor Matthew Bender and his students are archiving the oral histories of victims of Superstorm Sandy. “I think they provide a really good way for people in the future to look back and Powerful stories: TCNJ launches Hurricane Sandy projectNJ.comall 2 news articles »
  • New Jersey college archiving oral history of Sandy - The Trentonian

    24 May 2015 | 12:56 pm
    Chron.comNew Jersey college archiving oral history of SandyThe TrentonianNEWARK >> Students at a New Jersey college have joined the push to preserve memories of a storm that destroyed homes and businesses along the shore. The College of New Jersey has launched an oral history archive to collect the experiences of people ...What's your most striking Hurricane Sandy memory?NJ.comall 57 news articles »
  • Bookshelf: A Lakota woman's rich harvest of oral history - The Capital Journal

    20 May 2015 | 10:39 pm
    Bookshelf: A Lakota woman's rich harvest of oral historyThe Capital JournalIt reads almost like one of the Just So stories, only this one has all the marks of an authentic oral tradition behind it: How the Lakota got their horses. The story Josephine Waggoner heard, and which she carefully wrote down decades later, suggests
  • Kentucky Historical Society awards oral history grants - The Lane Report

    20 May 2015 | 1:29 pm
    Kentucky Historical Society awards oral history grantsThe Lane ReportAppalshop Video History Project: $5,000 to create an oral history collection that will be used in different projects to mark Appalshop's 50th anniversary in 2019. Project director: Jeffrey A. Keith. Institutional Partner: Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral
  • Read This: An oral history of Industrial Light & Magic - A.V. Club

    19 May 2015 | 1:03 pm
    A.V. ClubRead This: An oral history of Industrial Light & MagicA.V. ClubAs immense a pop cultural touchstone as Star Wars is, George Lucas' greatest legacy is probably the founding of Industrial Light & Magic (ILM), one of the most enduring and influential special effects houses in the history of film. On the occasion of 7 things I learned from the Wired oral history of Industrial Light & MagicHitFixMichael Bay likes screaming, and 8 other things we just learned about Entertainment Weekly (blog)Lucas, Spielberg, Abrams grace Wired cover to honor ILM at…
 
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    StoryCorps

  • StoryCorps 428: Your Father's Smile

    NPR
    22 May 2015 | 2:15 pm
    In this Memorial Day episode, we'll hear from a daughter who lost her father 50 years ago in Vietnam, and a son who discovered something about his father one Memorial Day.
  • StoryCorps 427: In the Stairwell

    NPR
    19 May 2015 | 12:21 pm
    This is the story of a father's grief at losing his son to a policeman's bullet. It happened two decades before Ferguson or Baltimore, and long before smartphone videos. Nicholas Heyward Sr. came to StoryCorps to remember his son, Nicholas Jr., who was 13 when he died.
  • StoryCorps 426: Mom

    NPR
    7 May 2015 | 3:14 pm
    In this special Mother's Day episode, we hear from a single mother, two women who were sent to a home for unwed mothers in the '60s, and another mom, who shares how she dealt with her son coming out. Also: StoryCorps founder Dave Isay shares a story from our new app.
  • StoryCorps 425: Evolution

    NPR
    27 Apr 2015 | 2:40 pm
    In the 1970s, Pastor David Ned was living in a rough neighborhood in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. At the time he was nicknamed "Brave Dave" and carried a gun for protection. In an interview with his friend, Darius C. Monroe, Ned remembered a time when he had to make a decision about whether or not to use it.
  • StoryCorps 424: April 19, 1995

    NPR
    17 Apr 2015 | 1:58 pm
    To commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing, we're featuring two interviews from survivors. Christopher Nguyen and PJ Allen are two of the only six children at the day care center in the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building to survive the bombing.
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    What Endures...

  • Jazz Fest Oral History Project

    jabrah1
    30 Apr 2015 | 11:19 am
    The Williams Center continues its four-year partnership with Dr. Helen Regis in the LSU Department of Geography & Anthropology and the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival and Foundation Archive to document the history and culture of the New Orleans…Read more ›
  • Louisiana Loses Noted Historian, Michael Mizell-Nelson

    jabrah1
    5 Dec 2014 | 7:40 am
    Louisiana has truly lost a great man, an advocate for public history, and a beloved University of New Orleans professor. Michael Mizell-Nelson died at the age of forty-nine this week in New Orleans. He had a passion for the city’s history…Read more ›
  • “As I walked in water up to my chest I promised that … I would never again get caught in a storm.”

    jabrah1
    29 Aug 2014 | 7:21 am
    Stories and memories keep events alive so that we might learn and become stronger and smarter for the next time we face adversity. The Center holds several oral history collections documenting events like Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Audrey, and Betsy, and…Read more ›
  • Jumpstart Your Studies With Help From Oral History

    jabrah1
    27 Aug 2014 | 8:24 am
    Welcome back, LSU students! From freshmen to seasoned graduate students, we wish you well in your academic endeavors this semester. As classes get underway, you’ll soon have papers due and project deadlines looming. Get a jumpstart on your studies with…Read more ›
  • “Holding the Welfare of Three Million People in Your Hands”: The British Voices from South Asia Series

    jabrah1
    15 Aug 2014 | 9:42 am
    By Erin M. Hess Today marks the sixty-seventh anniversary of the Indian Independence Act of 1947, and the establishment of India and Pakistan as sovereign nations after nearly ninety years of British rule. Happy Independence Day to all who are…Read more ›
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    Brooklyn Historical Society Blog

  • Photo of the Week: Coffee in Brooklyn

    Tess Colwell
    20 May 2015 | 2:30 am
    More Coffee Drinking When National Prohibition Comes, circa 1920; V1973.5.914, Brooklyn photograph and illustration collection, ARC.202, Brooklyn Historical Society. Artisanal coffee roasters in Brooklyn have been popping up everywhere in recent years, but it might come as a surprise that Brooklyn has a long history of coffee roasting that spans long before it was considered hip. The photo of the week was taken around 1920 in a warehouse at Bush Terminal (now Industry City) and features two men lifting a large bag of coffee. To me, the most interesting part of this photograph is actually the…
 
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    All about family!

  • 離乳食後期の進め方!量の目安は?遊び食べの対策はある?

    こっこ
    24 May 2015 | 8:50 pm
    おすわりやハイハイが上手にできるようになったり、つかまり立ちができたり。 生後9~11ヶ月頃になると、運動能力も発達してきて、 目に見える成長を感じられるので、嬉しい時期ですよね(*´ω`*) ・・一方、良いことばかりではなく、離乳食に関しては、 があったり、が始まったり、、 そんな悩みに差し掛かる頃でもあります。 今回は、について。 量の目安やメニューの提案と共に、私が実践して効果のあった、 もまとめました。…
  • 離乳食中期の進め方!手づかみ食べはいつから始める?

    こっこ
    20 May 2015 | 9:16 pm
    が始まって1ヵ月。 1回食も軌道に乗ってきたし、そろそろ2回食へ進めようかな! 今回は、離乳食中期(生後7~8ヶ月)の進め方についてです。 どんなものが食べられるようになる? 手づかみはいつから始めるの? 離乳食を作るときのコツってあるかな? この時期に気を付けることは・・? なんて疑問をもっている、あなたのお役にたてるはずです♪ 離乳食/中期(生後7~8ヶ月) 1日2回。 その後母乳、もしくはミルク…
  • 離乳食初期の進め方!メニュー例や上手にあげるコツも紹介♪

    こっこ
    18 May 2015 | 3:39 am
    もう少しでを迎える、我が子。 食べ物にも興味が出てきているし、そろそろを始めようかな! っと、意気込んでみたものの・・ 何からあげたらいいのかな? 欲しがるだけ、あげていいの? 食材は、1種類ずつあげる方がいいの? 次の食材に移るタイミングは・・? などなど、初めてだと何もかもが、ちんぷんかんぷん。 実際に始めてみるも、になることも、ありますよね。…
  • 離乳食はいつから始める?早過ぎるとアレルギーを起こしやすくなるの?

    こっこ
    17 May 2015 | 4:38 am
    寝てばかりだった赤ちゃんが、少しずつ起きている時間が長くなり、 寝返りが出来るようになって・・ 生まれて数ヶ月間の、劇的な成長スピードには、本当にびっくりさせられますよね(*’-‘*) 成長に感動しているうちに、気が付くともう5ヶ月。  そろそろ気になるのが、です。 周りのママ友たちから、もう始めてるよ~なんて声を聞くと、 うちも始めた方がいいのかな?と、考えはじめますよね。…
  • 2歳児の夕食献立~マンネリ化を脱したいときのメニュー

    こっこ
    15 May 2015 | 6:56 pm
    2歳の子供と一緒にいただく夕食の献立(^^) 我が家で実際に作っているものを、紹介しています。 早速、1週間の献立メニューです。 メインのおかずは、こちら!: 今週は、洋食やメキシカンなど和食以外の料理も取り入れて、マンネリ化を脱出。 基本的には和食中心ですが、 たまには違った料理をいただくことで、味覚を鍛えることにもつながります♪ 2歳児の夕食献立~マンネリ化を脱したいときのメニュー 【副菜2】ツナコーンサラダ…
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    Empty Nest Genealogy

  • Protecting genealogy data and files!

    Christine Blythe
    24 May 2015 | 10:16 am
    After twenty years of genealogy research, I have learned a few things about the fragility of the valuable data and files we work hard to accumulate. In response, I have worked hard to develop some good habits when it comes to protecting genealogy data and files.   Some of the issues I’ve encountered in the ...
  • eBooks from Google eBooks and Internet Archive: A researcher’s gold mine!

    Christine Blythe
    23 May 2015 | 6:03 am
    This article’s title “eBooks from Google eBooks and Internet Archive: A researcher’s gold mine!” aptly describes how I feel about including ebooks and online publications and libraries in my genealogy research.   I believe in using primary sources as much as possible in my genealogy research. This is the only way to be sure the ...
  • Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to May 22, 2015.

    Christine Blythe
    22 May 2015 | 11:21 am
    Following are the most recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to May 22, 2015.   FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions   Australia Australia, New South Wales, 1828 Census Australia, Tasmania, Civil Registration of Births, 1899-1912 Australia, Victoria, Assisted Immigrant Arrivals at Victorian Ports, 1839-1871 Belgium Belgium, Hainaut, Civil Registration, 1600-1913 Belgium, Liège, Civil Registration, 1621-1914 ...
  • Did my children’s ancestors fight on both sides of the War of 1812?

    Christine Blythe
    20 May 2015 | 8:06 am
    Of all the wars our ancestors have fought, the War of 1812 is the one that most interests me because I’m Canadian, and the result of this war is recognized as the birth of our nation. After researching ancestors on both sides, I’ve discovered several on Mark’s side who fought in the War of 1812, ...
  • Getting the most from Library and Archives Canada databases.

    Christine Blythe
    19 May 2015 | 11:30 am
    The wealth of information on the Library and Archives Canada website has become more easily searchable over the years as more and more indexing has occurred.   As one who is very familiar with and has used this site for years, I have found it to be so extensive that I make sure to bookmark ...
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    Louisiana Genealogy Blog

  • Memorial Day 2015

    Louisiana Genealogy Blogs
    25 May 2015 | 1:39 am
      Caplan Eye Clinic World War II Casualty List  US NAVY- Louisiana  Korean War Casualty List - LouisianaWorld War II Army Air Force Casualty - Dead or Missing List - Louisiana  Memorial Day - NARA Prologue: Pieces of History There are so many pages of names in small print...
  • LSU Libraries Special Collections - Louisiana Genealogy Materials

    Louisiana Genealogy Blogs
    3 Apr 2015 | 10:36 am
    January 2015 Guide to LSU Special Collections - Louisiana Genealogy Materials 1. Introduction 2. Census Records 3. Birth and Marriage Records 4. Death and Burial Records 5. Church Records 6. Military Records 7. Passenger and Crew Lists 8. Land and Estate Records 9. Directories 10. African Americans 11. Cajuns / French Canadians 12. Other Ethnic Groups 13. Cuban and Dominican Papers 14. Newspapers 15. Miscellaneous Resources
  • Headstone hiding in Capitol Hill Closet 20 Years - Where is it now?

    Louisiana Genealogy Blogs
    14 Jun 2014 | 1:34 pm
    1910 Orleans Parish Grooms' Marriage Index  Deaver Stephen Courtenay 29 M - Wid. L. M. Lemeunier 40 05/07/1910 Vol.32 P.187  1890 Orleans Parish Marriage Index  Lemeunier Louis M. 60 M - Ida E. Nock 21 12/22/1890 Vol.14 P.911  Louisiana Secretary of State Archive - Death Records March 9, 1967 Gasden Times - http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=9K4fAAAAIBAJ&sjid=6NYEAAAAIBAJ&pg=1028%2C1879184  Ida Deaver died in 1931 and is listed as buried in Greenwood cemetery 33 Willow Myrtle Jessamine Update June 18, 2014 Email today (June 18, 2014) from…
  • August 1888 Hurricane - Storm No. 3 - Pass Manchac Lighthouse

    Louisiana Genealogy Blogs
    14 Jun 2014 | 10:07 am
    "The dwelling at Pass Manchac was home to the Succow family for over fifty years. Anthony Succow began his service as keeper in 1868. His wife, Mary, took over in 1873, and she was followed by her son Hugo in 1909." - Lighthouse FriendsA few storm notes - http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/Landsea/Partagas/1888-1890/1888.pdfMuch of the NOAA archive reprinted from 1888 cannot be read properly or appear missing.1918 "August 18-20th, 1888. This hurricane was considered the "severest and most extensive" to hit Louisiana since the Racer's Storm of 1837. It affected much of northern Gulf coast. In…
  • Work First, Then Have Fun

    Louisiana Genealogy Blogs
    14 Jun 2014 | 6:35 am
    Billboard Nov 14, 1942, Vol. 54, No. 46. ISSN 0006-2510, Published by Nielsen Business Media, Inc, November 14, 1942, p. 39.
 
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    blog.genealogybank.com

  • My Ancestor’s Trip to America: Newspapers Tell the Story

    Thomas Jay Kemp
    22 May 2015 | 8:00 am
    My Ancestor’s Trip to America: Newspapers Tell the Story was originally published at .I knew my ancestor William Kemp had come to America – but I didn’t know anything about the trip itself. What was it like for him as an immigrant traveling by passenger ship across the ocean to the new frontier? Could GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives help me find the answer? I knew that William came to America on board the ship Benjamin Adams, arriving 21 October 1853. He left from Liverpool, England, and arrived in New York City. Painting: “The Bay and Harbor of New York” by Samuel…
  • Wisconsin Archives: 105 Newspapers Online for Genealogy Research

    Tony Pettinato
    21 May 2015 | 7:59 am
    Wisconsin Archives: 105 Newspapers Online for Genealogy Research was originally published at .Wisconsin, part of America’s Midwest, is bordered by two Great Lakes: Lake Superior on the north and Lake Michigan on the east. The nation’s 23rd largest state and 20th most populous, Wisconsin is known as “America’s Dairyland” because of all its dairy farms, milk production, and world-famous cheese. Photo: the Daniel E. Krause Stone Barn in Chase, Wisconsin, built in 1903. Credit: KKNiteOwl; Wikimedia Commons. If you are researching your ancestry from Wisconsin, you will want to use…
  • 20 May 1932: Amelia Earhart’s Solo Flight across the Atlantic

    Tony Pettinato
    20 May 2015 | 8:00 am
    20 May 1932: Amelia Earhart’s Solo Flight across the Atlantic was originally published at . Amelia Earhart, the pioneering female pilot, achieved enduring fame with the many aviation records she set during the 1920s and ’30s. Early in her career she achieved an impressive feat when she became the first woman to receive a pilot’s license from the distinguished National Aeronautic Association, on 16 May 1923. In 1928 she became the first woman to cross the Atlantic by plane when she flew as part of the crew (her duty was to keep the flight log) with Wilmer Stultz and Louis Gordon. Photo:…
  • List of 450+ Historical Newspapers Just Added Continued – Page 4

    Thomas Jay Kemp
    19 May 2015 | 2:58 pm
    List of 450+ Historical Newspapers Just Added Continued – Page 4 was originally published at .We just made a major addition of more than 450 historical newspapers, all of them new to our online newspaper archives.This is a continuation of our complete list of 450+ historical newspapers just added to GenealogyBank. You are currently viewing page 4 which lists newspapers 301 to the end. State City Title Date Range Collection 301 New Mexico> Santa Fe Santa Fe Daily New Mexican 12/9/1869–12/31/1877 Newspaper Archives 302 New Mexico> Silver City Southwest Sentinel…
  • List of 450+ Historical Newspapers Just Added Continued – Page 3

    Thomas Jay Kemp
    19 May 2015 | 2:18 pm
    List of 450+ Historical Newspapers Just Added Continued – Page 3 was originally published at .We just made a major addition of more than 450 historical newspapers, all of them new to our online newspaper archives.This is a continuation of our complete list of 450+ historical newspapers just added to GenealogyBank. You are currently viewing page 3 which lists newspapers 201 – 300. State City Title Date Range Collection 201 Maryland Cumberland Cumberland Daily News 04/05/1871–04/02/1872 Newspaper Archives 202 Maryland Elkton Cecil Whig 08/14/1841–09/01/1866 Newspaper Archives 203…
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    Radaris

  • Long-Lost Sisters Reunited in College Writing Class

    radaris
    22 May 2015 | 11:27 am
    Earlier this month, ABC news uncovered a touching reunion story between two long-lost sisters. Lizzie Valverde, 34, and Katy Olson, 35, were born in Tampa FL and given up for adoption by their mother in 1982. The sisters were adopted separately, Lizzie to a family in New Jersey and Katy to a family in Florida. […]
  • Memorial Day Thanks

    radaris
    21 May 2015 | 11:11 am
    Memorial Day is a time to spend with family and friends and enjoy a day off, but it is also a day to reflect and remember the fallen heroes that have given their lives for our safety and freedom.   The holiday was created after the Civil War to remember the men and women who […]
  • Family History Research Guide and Infographic

    radaris
    12 May 2015 | 11:09 am
    Looking into your family history can often provide answers to any questions you might have about your family and their past dating back to centuries ago. While the reasons people decide to dig into their ancestry vary, many genealogists are on the hunt for information about family secrets and research to preserve memories for their […]
  • Family History Research Infographic

    radaris
    12 May 2015 | 10:51 am
  • Top Mother’s Day Gift Reviews

    radaris
    6 May 2015 | 7:28 am
    Happy (early) Mothers Day to all the wonderful mom’s out there. To show our gratitude and love for you, we want to give all the non-moms out there some gift ideas for the maternal figures in your life. Three of the most popular gifts to give on mother’s day are her favorite flowers, a spa […]
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    Researching Relatives

  • WWI Death: Remembering George J. Stenglein

    Joanne Cowden
    25 May 2015 | 6:00 am
    On this Memorial Day, I would like to take time to remember my great-uncle George J. Stenglein who was killed in action during World War I. He was only 27 years old.George's mother, Kunigunda Boser Stenglein, was pregnant with him when she and her husband John left Germany and arrived in New York on May 6, 1891. George was born eight days later in Newburgh, Orange County, New York. It was a temporary stop since the family settled in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the following year.In 1910, at the age of 19, George was a laborer at a Pittsburgh bottle factory. His 1917 draft registration card…
  • Ancestor Advertisements

    Joanne Cowden
    22 May 2015 | 6:00 am
    I love old advertisements and have been known to browse publications just to look at the ads. While the examples below are rather plain, they are the ads of my husband's 2nd great-grandfather so that makes them special (at least to me). He died in 1907 due to a trolley accident, but clearly he had no intention of slowing down or retiring since he placed these ads when he was 66 years old.Presbyterian Cook-Book, Compiled by the Ladies of the FirstPresbyterian Church of McKeesport, PA, 1900Pittsburgh and Allegheny City Directory, 1900Related Post:The Two Obituaries of John Wilson Stewart
  • Enforcement of the Compulsory Education Act

    Joanne Cowden
    20 May 2015 | 6:00 am
    The man who I believe is my 2nd great-uncle, Fred Waldschmidt, was an alderman in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, when he fined a man $3.58 for refusing to send his 11-year-old son to school. This eventually led to jail time, and an article that appeared in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette on February 3, 1898, said that "[t]his is believed to be the first imprisonment made in this state under the new compulsory education act."Alderman Waldschmidt had seen this man before for the same issue. The first time, Andrew Nieman was dismissed after promising to make sure his son attended school. Since that didn't…
  • Family Marriage: 50+ Years of Beautiful Music

    Joanne Cowden
    18 May 2015 | 6:00 am
    On May 18, 1934, William Jefferson Simmons married Harriet "Terry" McGovern in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. William Jefferson (called "Jeff" by my father) was my 1st cousin twice removed.Jeff's life was full of music. At the age of 21, he started his career as a teacher at the South Hills School of Music, which was located on Brownsville Road in the Knoxville neighborhood of Pittsburgh. According to his obituary in New York's Clinton Courier, he graduated from Carnegie Mellon University's School of Music. After his time as a music teacher and public school supervisor, "he was organist and…
  • Cyclist Frank Lenz Left from Pittsburgh in 1892

    Joanne Cowden
    15 May 2015 | 6:00 am
    Image from The Wheel and Cycling Trade Review, 1888On May 15, 1892, Frank Lenz began his multi-year bicycle tour of the world. He would never return to his hometown of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.Frank reported on his progress for Outing, in both words and photos. His plan was described in the May 1892 issue:"Mr. Frank G. Lenz, a well-known wheelman, of Pittsburg, Pa., will, on May 15th, start on a world-girdling tour awheel. He will ride a 'Victor' pneumatic, and profiting by Mr. Stevens' experience, will travel westward instead of eastward, thus taking advantage of the sequence of the climatic…
 
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    Fold3 Blog| Fold3 Blog

  • Find: WWII Color Photos

    Trevor
    20 May 2015 | 7:00 am
    When many of us think of photos from World War II, we think of black-and-white images. After all, most of the iconic photographs from the war—like those capturing the flag raising on Iwo Jima or the VJ Day kiss in Times Square—are in that medium. But actually, color photography had slowly been becoming more popular and available in the years leading up to the war. So while it was still quicker and easier to shoot and develop black-and-white photos, a growing number of war photographers began using color film to capture the people, places, and events of the World War II, giving us…
  • TMIH: The Sinking of the : May 7, 1915

    Trevor
    4 May 2015 | 12:45 pm
    On May 7, 1915, the British passenger liner RMS Lusitania was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine off the coast of Ireland, killing 1,198 passengers and crew and sparking outrage on both sides of the Atlantic. When the Lusitania set out on its final voyage on May 1, World War I had been raging for almost a year (though America was still neutral), and Germany had begun unrestricted submarine warfare around the British Isles. Still, despite a warning placed in newspapers by the German embassy that anyone traveling on a British or Allied ship did so at their own risk, many felt that the…
  • 150th Anniversary (1865–2015) This Month in the Civil War: Battle of Palmito Ranch

    Trevor
    4 May 2015 | 12:35 pm
    On May 12–13, 1865, 800 Federal troops under Colonel Theodore H. Barrett engaged Colonel John S. Ford‘s 350 Confederates outside Brownsville, Texas, in the Battle of Palmito (Palmetto) Ranch, the last battle of the Civil War. Although an informal agreement to avoid conflict had existed between the Federals and Confederates along the Rio Grande since March, Barrett (who had only recently taken command) decided to launch an attack. A few hundred of his troops advanced on White’s Ranch on May 12, only to find it deserted, so the Federals continued on to Palmito Ranch, skirmishing…
  • Free Access to the World War II Collection

    Trevor
    1 May 2015 | 12:51 pm
    This May 8 marks the 70th anniversary of Victory in Europe (VE) Day in 1945. If you have family members who served in World War II, or are just interested in the time period, take a look at Fold3’s World War II Collection, which you can access for free from May 1st to 15th. The WWII Collection, currently with over 72 million records, has a diverse array of resources to mine, whether you’re interested in historical aspects of the war or are searching for specific individuals who fought in it. A few of the most popular titles in this collection are Missing Air Crew Reports, WWII…
  • Find: Lincoln’s Assassination

    Trevor
    20 Apr 2015 | 7:00 am
    This month marks the 150th anniversary of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. He was shot on April 14 around 10 o’clock at night while attending a play at Ford’s Theatre in Washington DC. The assassin, actor John Wilkes Booth, entered the Lincolns’ box and shot the president in the back of the head before jumping out of the box and escaping the theater. President Lincoln, who never regained consciousness, was taken to a boardinghouse across the street, where he died nine hours after being shot, at 7:22 in the morning. About the same time as Lincoln’s…
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