Personal History - Genealogy

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  • Jul 28, Writing About Hardship

    Writing Your Life Story Blog
    28 Jul 2014 | 3:17 pm
    I've been reflecting this past week about hardship, difficulties and troubles. The life challenges we face, big and small, can often make up the bulk of a memoir or life story. Everything from large issues like abuse, death of loved ones, wars, poverty and diseases to the smaller and more mundane issues like broken appliances, lost car keys or petty arguments can be fertile ground for exploring how we live and, more importantly, how we deal with life on life terms.
  • Busting Buttons

    The Heart and Craft of Life Writing
    25 Jul 2014 | 8:58 am
    If there’s anything as satisfying as laying eyes and hands on the first print copy of a book I’ve written, it’s having the same experience with a friend’s book. Especially when I know how hard that friend struggled to make the book happen. Thus I whooped with joy last week when Ellen Dehouske handed me a copy of We Feed Each Other: Nourishment through Friendships, her “memoir of sorts.”Joyful tears filled my heart as I beheld this substantial volume with the strikingly gorgeous cover and lovely layout. I had witnessed many of the labor pains preceding the birth of this book.I…
  • Who Do You Think You Are? Recap: Jesse Tyler Ferguson Fills in the Gaps in Multiple Acts

    Ancestry.com Blog
    Jessica Murray
    31 Jul 2014 | 3:18 pm
    Screenwriters, playwrights, and storytellers have been using the three act structure to tell their stories for generations. Any story requires a setup, rising action, a climax and a resolution. When we’re researching the family histories of the celebrities for an episode of Who Do You Think You Are? we also look at how we can tell the story in a narrative arc. And to fill in the events and scenes for each act of an episode, we create timelines.For Jesse Tyler Ferguson’s episode, we created multiple timelines to follow the story of Jesse’s great-grandfather Jesse Wheat Uppercu. Jesse…
  • My Non-Geneaholic Thursday - 31 July 2014

    The Geneaholic
    31 Jul 2014 | 10:31 pm
    July is done, bring on August!  We've been warm here in Chula Vista the past week or so - temps over 85 F almost every day with humidity.  Fans are running, windows pen at night, shirts are off...trying to stay cool. *  Read email and blogs - wrote Treasure Chest Thursday - Post 225: 1901 Census of Canada for Alexander Sovereen Household and then Comments on "How Should Genealogical Societies Nurture Beginners?" and set it for later.*  We left at 11 a.m. for the Padres game, ate lunch quickly at Project Pie in CV Center, then to the E Street trolley…
  • Ask your mother!

    Before My Time
    28 Jul 2014 | 5:49 am
    Today I did a Google search to find out what kinds of birds besides robins lay blue eggs. I clicked on Images in hopes of quickly finding a comparison chart. For whatever inexplicable net-surfer reason, I then clicked on a charming little picture of a nest with three blue eggs in it, and ... voilà! ... serendipity happened! As family historians, we've all seen some great lists of questions to ask our relatives about the past. This list has some fresh questions that might result in some really interesting answers from your closest relative: 10 Questions to Ask Your Mother Now
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    Writing Your Life Story Blog

  • Jul 28, Writing About Hardship

    28 Jul 2014 | 3:17 pm
    I've been reflecting this past week about hardship, difficulties and troubles. The life challenges we face, big and small, can often make up the bulk of a memoir or life story. Everything from large issues like abuse, death of loved ones, wars, poverty and diseases to the smaller and more mundane issues like broken appliances, lost car keys or petty arguments can be fertile ground for exploring how we live and, more importantly, how we deal with life on life terms.
  • Jul 21, Nostalgia Can Make You Feel Older and Younger

    21 Jul 2014 | 6:01 pm
    Nostalgia is defined as a sentimental longing for something in the past that we associate with happy memories. It can be triggered in various ways, by seeing an old friend, remembering a special date, historic event, seeing an old advertisement, hearing a favorite old song or watching an old TV show or movie. Isn't it interesting how nostalgia can make you feel both older and younger?
  • Jul 14, Animating Past Interviews of Cultural Icons - Blank on Blank and Storytelling

    14 Jul 2014 | 4:02 pm
    Over the years there have been many interviews of famous people by journalists. Some of these we've heard, but many are tucked away and could be easily lost if not preserved and presented by someone. Someone, for instance, like Blank on Blank, a multimedia nonprofit with the simple mission of taking unheard oral history interviews and bringing them to life on radio, YouTube and other platforms. This is an interesting way to present storytelling.
  • Jul 10, Meaningful Home Objects

    10 Jul 2014 | 11:04 am
    I came across a cowbird (cowbird.com) story yesterday that fit right in with the idea of using common and/or treasured items as prompts for stories. Our lives are full of experiences and some objects help us recall them. As I look around my home there are many things I see that are important and prompt special feelings and memories. Photographs, artwork, my vast CD collection, the vase gifted to me from my late aunt, and even the coffee maker in the kitchen.
  • Jul 7, Personal History Is Often a Later in Life Career

    7 Jul 2014 | 3:46 pm
    You might find Telling Life's Stories: Four Late-Blooming Personal Historians, written by Lynne Strang as a guest post for Debra Eve's Later Bloomer (Creativity Never Gets Old) laterbloomer.com site revealing. In her well written piece she explores the interest, drive and satisfaction of four personal historians (myself included) who entered the field later in life.
 
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    The Heart and Craft of Life Writing

  • Busting Buttons

    25 Jul 2014 | 8:58 am
    If there’s anything as satisfying as laying eyes and hands on the first print copy of a book I’ve written, it’s having the same experience with a friend’s book. Especially when I know how hard that friend struggled to make the book happen. Thus I whooped with joy last week when Ellen Dehouske handed me a copy of We Feed Each Other: Nourishment through Friendships, her “memoir of sorts.”Joyful tears filled my heart as I beheld this substantial volume with the strikingly gorgeous cover and lovely layout. I had witnessed many of the labor pains preceding the birth of this book.I…
  • Your Friend, the Comma

    18 Jul 2014 | 1:48 pm
    Comma, common. Yes, commas are common, but that doesn’t mean they don’t deserve respect. Strangely enough, this common little punctuation mark intimidates legions of writers. Others treat it in a cavalier fashion. I admit to being one of the latter. In 1984, I flippantly told Kay DuPont, a national speaker and author of a book on grammar and punctuation that “I punctuate intuitively and put commas where I think I need them.” Was that pity I saw in her glance? When I saw buckets of red ink the Lighthouse Point Press editors sloshed all over my first book, Do’s, Don’ts and Donuts I…
  • Make New Friends: Writing Layers of Meaning

    11 Jul 2014 | 8:57 am
    Make new friends, but keep the old,One is silver and the other gold.This classic friendship song began endlessly looping on brain radio the other day. Inspired by Kathy Pooler’s blog post,A Tribute to My Girlfriends, I sat down to pen a post about friendship. What emerged is far from what I set out to write. I began writing about the fact unlike Kathy, who has remained close with numerous friends for decades, my friends are more situational, coming and going as our respective interests change, and … that paragraph was never finished. Something about the thought didn’t quite ring true,…
  • Brain Thorns

    3 Jul 2014 | 12:49 pm
    “All sentences are not created equal.”That sentence jams a cactus into my brain, triggering wild buzzing and a whirl of obsessive thoughts. Even if the story I’m reading is sweet and beautiful as a cactus blossom, when I hear any variation of “All men are not tall”,  my brain revs up like an angry hornet. I know the intention: to contradict the clearly false idea that all men ARE tall. The literal meaning of that sentence is that no men are tall. Obviously that’s as false as the initial statement. The world is full of men of a wide range of heights. The accurate meaning is…
  • Daily Life Under a Microscope

    26 Jun 2014 | 11:40 am
    “My life is so ordinary! Nobody would be interested!” This statement vies with the desire to keep secrets and protect privacy as the top reason people give for not writing their lifestories. Poppycock! I’m pretty sure a centipede’s knee would be fascinating if looked at under a microscope and described with flair. Besides, what we take for granted today will be exotic to our great-grandchildren in fifty years. Wouldn’t you like to know what daily life was like for your ancestors 100 years ago? In today’s guest post, Pittsburgh resident Bea Carter put her plain vanilla morning…
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    Ancestry.com Blog

  • Who Do You Think You Are? Recap: Jesse Tyler Ferguson Fills in the Gaps in Multiple Acts

    Jessica Murray
    31 Jul 2014 | 3:18 pm
    Screenwriters, playwrights, and storytellers have been using the three act structure to tell their stories for generations. Any story requires a setup, rising action, a climax and a resolution. When we’re researching the family histories of the celebrities for an episode of Who Do You Think You Are? we also look at how we can tell the story in a narrative arc. And to fill in the events and scenes for each act of an episode, we create timelines.For Jesse Tyler Ferguson’s episode, we created multiple timelines to follow the story of Jesse’s great-grandfather Jesse Wheat Uppercu. Jesse…
  • Throwback Thursday Topic: Games We Played

    Juliana Smith
    31 Jul 2014 | 7:05 am
    Growing up we played a lot of games. Some were your typical kids’ games, some were completely made up. I remember a girlfriend and I had a marathon game of Monopoly one summer. We would play every morning until we got tired and then leave it for the next day, when we’d pick up where we left off. I can’t remember who won, but it kept us busy for several weeks that summer.When we visited our cousins who had a pool, Marco Polo was a given. Water dodge-ball was also lots of fun.Hide ‘n’ seek was popular on the block where we lived. Everyone knew everyone, so the entire block was…
  • Welcome to the Sooner State! Oklahoma State Research Guide

    Anne Gillespie Mitchell
    31 Jul 2014 | 6:39 am
    Oklahoma became the 46th state on November 16, 1907.Library of Congress, “A pair of truants, tending their father’s mules.,” color digital file from b&w original, Prints & Photographs Online Catalog, ( http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/nclc.00666 : accessed 29 Jul 2014), photo taken April 1917, Reproduction no. LC-DIG-nclc-00666.Five things you may not have known about the Sooner State:Originally Indian Territory, the state of Oklahoma was opened to settlers in a “Land Rush” in 1889. Prospective settlers would be allowed to claim plots of land by grabbing the…
  • Be The Star of Your Own Who Do You Think You Are? Show

    Jessica Murray
    30 Jul 2014 | 12:35 pm
    WDYTYA Star ContestHave you watched Who Do You Think You Are? and wished you could travel the world to discover more about your own ancestors’ past? Then we have a giveaway for you!We are picking one lucky winner for the ultimate Who Do You Think You Are? experience, which includes a trip to your family’s homeland plus time with a professional genealogist to help research your family history, just like the stars on the show.Watch the Who Do You Think You Are? episode airing tonight on TLC at 9p|8c that features Jesse Tyler Ferguson, then visit the Be A Who Do You Think You Are?
  • Long-Lost Sisters United After 60 Years Apart

    Jessica Murray
    30 Jul 2014 | 5:05 am
    Long-lost sisters Carol and Amy went most of their lives never knowing of one another until their passion for genealogy brought them together in 2013.Veteran genealogist Carol Moss was adopted 60 years ago and only last year decided to research her birth mother’s history. In doing so, Carol discovered an abundance of photos attached to Amy Woodrick’s family tree and she immediately believed Amy to be a possible half-sister. Since Carol wasn’t certain if Amy knew of her existence, she was hesitant to reach out but continued her research by saving shared tree and image information to her…
 
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    The Geneaholic

  • My Non-Geneaholic Thursday - 31 July 2014

    31 Jul 2014 | 10:31 pm
    July is done, bring on August!  We've been warm here in Chula Vista the past week or so - temps over 85 F almost every day with humidity.  Fans are running, windows pen at night, shirts are off...trying to stay cool. *  Read email and blogs - wrote Treasure Chest Thursday - Post 225: 1901 Census of Canada for Alexander Sovereen Household and then Comments on "How Should Genealogical Societies Nurture Beginners?" and set it for later.*  We left at 11 a.m. for the Padres game, ate lunch quickly at Project Pie in CV Center, then to the E Street trolley…
  • My Geneaholic Wednesday - 30 July 2014

    30 Jul 2014 | 10:44 pm
    This would have been my mother's 95th birthday, if she had lived.  I still miss her.*  Read email and blogs, and wrote Our Christmas 1977 Family Picture -- Post 318 for (Not So) Wordless Wednesday and then WikiChicks Genealogy News Network Launches.*  Packed up and left at 11 a.m. for McDonalds for lunch, then the library to return books, check in with John's group, and go to the CVGS meeting.  The speaker didn't have a presentation, she talked while Gary tried to put maps on the screen.  There was no broad overview of the topic, only what she knew…
  • My Geneaholic Tuesday - 29 July 2014

    29 Jul 2014 | 11:04 pm
    Two more days left in July, and I finally got around to updating my one August presentation.  Worked all day, until the Padres game in the evening.*  Read email and blogs, and wrote Tuesday's Tips - Use Facebook to Find, Join and Contribute to Genealogy Interest Groups and then wrote Finding the Taylor County, Iowa Properties of Devier J. Smith and set it for late morning.*  Updated my Source Citation talk and handout - still need some graphics, and need to update some things.  *  Figured out again how to use the Padres website and printed off our…
  • My Geneaholic Sunday and Monday - 27 and 28 July 2014

    28 Jul 2014 | 10:38 pm
    Sunday was notm uch of a genealogy day, but Monday sure was!1)  Sunday, 27 July 2014*  Read email and blogs, finished up the Best of the Genea-Blogs - 20 to 26 July 2014 post.*  We went off to church at 9:30 a.m., went to lunch at the new pizza place, and home by 1 p.m.*  Read, didn't do much else before going in to watch the Padres game, read the paper, then my book, eat dinner, and wash the dishes.  Pads lost to Atlanta 8-3.*  Online at 6 p.m. to read, then sorted the deed table into date order, and then transcribed the Amanuensis Monday post.*…
  • My Geneaholic Saturday - 26 July 2014

    26 Jul 2014 | 10:03 pm
    This was a pretty typical Saturday here in the genealogy cave - some blogging, some research, some society work, and some Family Tree work.*  Read email and blogs, and noted that Surname Saturday - WILSON (England > colonial Massachusetts) posted.*  Gathered up my stuff and went out at 9:40 a.m. to the FamilySearch Library to do the RootsMagic class at 10:30 a.m.  We had 7 in attendance.  We worked on answering questions and citing sources using both free-form and EE source templates.  *  Home by 1:40 p.m. to eat lunch, then added to the Best Of…
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    Before My Time

  • Ask your mother!

    28 Jul 2014 | 5:49 am
    Today I did a Google search to find out what kinds of birds besides robins lay blue eggs. I clicked on Images in hopes of quickly finding a comparison chart. For whatever inexplicable net-surfer reason, I then clicked on a charming little picture of a nest with three blue eggs in it, and ... voilà! ... serendipity happened! As family historians, we've all seen some great lists of questions to ask our relatives about the past. This list has some fresh questions that might result in some really interesting answers from your closest relative: 10 Questions to Ask Your Mother Now
  • Review: Blurb's New BookWright Software

    20 Jun 2014 | 12:49 pm
    In the interest of preserving my family history on real paper instead of letting it disappear into the virtual void, I've been making print-on-demand books for about four years. I use Blurb as my p-o-d company and the free BookSmart software they provide to create my books. I found the software easy to learn, and with it I've been able to do everything I've imagined. There's a glitch here and a quirk there, but I've learned to work around them, so I'm happy with BookSmart. I've completed 21 book projects and had them printed. On three occasions, I had to contact Customer Support due to…
  • A Dishonorable New Marketing Strategy at Blurb

    2 Jan 2014 | 5:58 am
    My favorite print-on-demand company, Blurb, has really pissed me off. When you upload a new book for printing, they are now pre-checking a box for you to include a PDF of your book with your order of actual real books, for which PDF you are charged $4.99. You have to notice and UNCHECK the box if you don't want it, and I did not notice until I had completed and paid for my order.When I immediately tried to cancel the order to redo it without the PDF, a preemptive little memo popped up that says you CAN'T cancel the PDF part of the order. I guess that's because it was immediately available for…
  • Erysipelas, and Some Other Useful Knowledge

    1 Dec 2013 | 6:22 am
    According to Joseph Hauer's Civil War pension file, he suffered from erysipelas. I found this explanation of the malady, written in 1856:Subsect. 3.—Erysipelas. 7147. This is also a febrile disease; but one of its essential characters is an inflammation of the skin. The skin is red, and this redness rapidly spreads; it is accompanied with swelling, of a variable amount, often very considerable. When it attacks the face, the appearance of the patient is totally altered by the swelling; all the features are confused, the eyes are concealed, the expression distorted; the person would not be…
  • Henry Joseph Hauer: Civil War Era Pension File

    1 Dec 2013 | 6:03 am
    Hauer Civil War Pension File
 
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    NPR: StoryCorps Podcast

  • StoryCorps 384: Never Your Fault

    NPR
    27 Jul 2014 | 11:04 pm
    Antero Garcia talks to his former student Roger Alvarez who dropped out during his senior year of high school.To hear more stories visit http://storycorps.org/listen. If you'd like to write to participants you can do so at podcast@storycorps.org.To make a donation visit http://storycorps.org/donateMusic Info: "Omberg" by Fredrik from the album Trilogi.
  • StoryCorps 383: License to Wed

    NPR
    17 Jul 2014 | 10:54 pm
    Clela Rorex, a former County Clerk in Boulder, Colorado, tells her friend Sue Larson about issuing marriage licenses to gay and lesbian couples in 1975.To hear more stories visit http://storycorps.org/listen. If you'd like to write to participants you can do so at podcast@storycorps.org. To make a donation visit http://storycorps.org/donateMusic Info:Naruto and the End of the Broken Ear by Fredrik: http://www.frdrk.org
  • StoryCorps 381: Not to Blame

    NPR
    13 Jul 2014 | 10:14 pm
    Aja David and her younger sister, Kai Leigh Harriott, remember the night Kai was hit by a stray bullet and paralyzed from the chest down. They spoke with their mother Tonya David.To hear more stories visit http://storycorps.org/listen. If you'd like to write to participants you can do so at podcast@storycorps.org. To make a donation visit http://storycorps.org/donateMusic Info: "Horizon Variations" by Max Richter from the album The Blue Notebooks. 
  • Podcast 381: It's A Calling

    NPR
    3 Jul 2014 | 10:24 pm
    Dekalb Walcott III talks to his dad, retired Chicago Fire Chief Dekalb Walcott Jr., about following in his line of work.To hear more stories visit http://storycorps.org/listen. If you'd like to write to participants you can do so at podcast@storycorps.org. To make a donation visit http://storycorps.org/donateMusic Info: Note Drop by Broke For Free:  http://brokeforfree.com It's A Callin' by 40Kalibur: https://soundcloud.com/40kalibur-dascorpionking
  • StoryCorps 380: Don't Sneak

    NPR
    27 Jun 2014 | 3:54 pm
    70-year-old Patrick Haggerty tells his daughter, Robin, about the day he first had a conversation with his father about being gay. To hear more stories visit http://storycorps.org/listen. If you'd like to write to participants you can do so at podcast@storycorps.org. To make a donation visit http://storycorps.org/donateMusic Info:Patience for Books by The Loom: http://www.reverbnation.com/theloomCome Out Singing by Lavender Country: http://www.paradiseofbachelors.com/lavender-country 
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    Brooklyn Historical Society Blog

  • Photo of the Week: Bathing in Brooklyn

    Halley Choiniere
    30 Jul 2014 | 2:30 am
    Free Floating Baths, ca. 1910, v1973.4.490; Postcard collection, v1973.4; Brooklyn Historical Society Free public pools for summer swimming and splashing are one of the pleasures of life in Brooklyn today, but perhaps not for Brooklynites living a century ago. I was at first confused, and then horrified when I realized that the building shown in this postcard from circa 1910 is a city bath in the river, near the mouth of the Gowanus Canal. These “floating baths” were built on pontoons in the Hudson and East rivers in the late 1800s. The NYC Department of Parks writes that the city began…
 
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    Memoir Mentor

  • Life Writing Yields Weight Loss & Other Benefits

    Memoir Mentor
    30 Jul 2014 | 5:31 pm
    My friend Lori Parker sent me an article published in Psychological Science claiming that certain kinds of personal, reflective writing can actually help you lose weight! How about that? Simply put, a study found that a group of female undergraduates assigned to write an essay about a value that was important to them lost a few pounds over the next few months. Those in a control group assigned to write about something else did not. Why? Analysts concluded that when people write about subjects that reinforce their self-integrity, they develop more ballast to sustain them during life’s…
  • Me and Robert the Bruce

    Memoir Mentor
    7 Jul 2014 | 3:41 pm
    I’m embarrassed to admit I never heard of Robert the Bruce until I saw the 1995 Mel Gibson movie, Braveheart, the Academy Award-winning biopic of thirteenth-century war hero William Wallace. Raibeart Bruis, as he was known in Norman French, was more of a peripheral character in Gibson’s story, though Wikipedia says Robert the Bruce was one of the most famous warriors of his generation, eventually leading Scotland during the Wars of Scottish Independence against England. He’s a national hero. The First King of Scotland. Who knew? As I said, I didn’t. I guess my attention was diverted…
  • My Online Self-Publishing Success Story

    Memoir Mentor
    3 Jul 2014 | 1:21 pm
    Readers:  At the end of this post, click on the link to an online magazine I’ve created for you with articles related to this topic. ________________ Some years ago my husband and I published Breathe Life into Your Life Story with a regular publisher. It takes a lot of work and luck to find a publisher willing to risk their time, money, and reputation on your book, especially if you’ve never published before. We were delighted to have snagged a company that we both admired. It was a small publisher, however, with a small budget and limited personnel and resources to put toward…
  • There are Book Signings… and Then There are Book Signings

    Memoir Mentor
    26 Jun 2014 | 10:46 pm
    I was so pleased I had been asked to signed books after I spoke at Jamboree a few weeks ago. Jamboree is an annual genealogy conference sponsored by the Southern California Genealogy Society at the Burbank Marriott. It’s one of the biggies. So, I sold and signed what I thought was a respectable amount of books–for me.  (There’s Pat Williams, one of my students, on the far right, buying a copy of my new family history, The Parrett Migration.) I went home feeling like I’d done something kinda special. UNTIL I HAD A REALITY CHECK!      SOME OF US SWIM IN…
  • A Book is Born! The Parrett Migration

    Memoir Mentor
    12 Jun 2014 | 5:18 pm
    When I was a bride in my twenties (many years ago), my husband and I stopped at a farm in Locust Grove, Iowa, on a cross-country trip to the East Coast. The farm was owned by Ken and Lois Parrett, distant cousins of mine I had never heard of until that day. They took me on a tour of the area and showed me land my ancestors once owned and cemeteries where they were buried. That visit turned out to be one of those turning points that send your life in a new trajectory. I wanted to know more about these Parretts, whose name I’d carried since my birth. Over the years, between raising…
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    emptynestancestry.com

  • William B. Coon – Soldier in the War of 1812

    Christine Blythe
    31 Jul 2014 | 6:31 am
    In a previous post, I told the story of David Coon, the fourth great grandfather to my children Erin and Stuart, and his service and death in the Civil War. His father, William B. Coon (about 1789 to August 25, 1854) was also a soldier, but in his case he served in the War of […]
  • Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions, 29 July, 2014

    Christine Blythe
    29 Jul 2014 | 1:04 pm
    Following are the recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions up to and including 29 July, 2014.   FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions Czechoslovakia Czech Republic, Censuses, 1800-1945 Korea Korea, Collection of Genealogies, 1500-2012 Spain Spain, Diocese of Lugo, Catholic Parish Records, 1550-1930 United States Idaho, Southeast Counties Obituaries, 1864-2007 Idaho, Southern Counties Obituaries, 1943-2013 Mormon […]
  • What happened to William Read Kirk after the devastating Ohio State Penitentiary fire of 1930?

    Christine Blythe
    29 Jul 2014 | 5:53 am
    The whereabouts of William Read Kirk after the Ohio State Penitentiary fire of 1930 is a fascinating and ongoing mystery for our family. After the death of my husband’s grandmother Louise Reynolds (nee Froemling) in 1989, family members received numerous documents, photos and pieces of correspondence that were found amongst her effects. Although Louise had […]
  • Sir William ap Thomas and Gwladus ferch Dafydd Gam

    Christine Blythe
    26 Jul 2014 | 8:24 am
    Sir William ap Thomas Herbert, (21st great grandfather to my children) was born about 1390 to Sir Thomas ap Gwilyn (1360-1438) and Maud de Morley (1375-    ). Sir William ap Thomas first married Elizabeth (or Isabel) Bluet (1380-1420), daughter of Sir John Bluet of Raglan Manor and Katherine Wogan, and widow of Sir James Berkeley. […]
  • Genealogy News Bites to July 26, 2014

    Christine Blythe
    26 Jul 2014 | 7:15 am
    Following are the most recent ancestry and genealogy news bites up to and including July 26, 2014. Vallejo Times-Herald Local News Genealogy quest leads Australian woman to Vallejo Genealogy work often requires much deep and time-consuming sleuthing, but often pays satisfying dividends for those interested in their family history and connections. Such was the case […]
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    blog.genealogybank.com

  • Top 7 Websites for Revolutionary War Genealogy

    Gena Philibert-Ortega
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:11 am
    Top 7 Websites for Revolutionary War Genealogy was originally published at .Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this blog post, Gena discusses—and provides links to—seven top online resources for researching your American Revolutionary War ancestors. Do you have a Revolutionary War ancestor? Maybe you have always heard that your ancestor was a soldier or a patriot during the American Revolution. Perhaps you have a female ancestor who was a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR). Do you have copies…
  • GenealogyBank Just Added 7 Million More Genealogy Records!

    Tony Pettinato
    25 Jul 2014 | 8:33 am
    GenealogyBank Just Added 7 Million More Genealogy Records! was originally published at .Every day, GenealogyBank is working hard to digitize more newspapers and obituaries, expanding our collection to give you the largest newspaper archives for family history research available anywhere online. We just completed adding 7 million more U.S. genealogy records, vastly increasing our content coverage from U.S. coast to coast! Here are some of the details about our most recent U.S. newspaper additions: A total of 52 newspaper titles from 21 U.S. states 19 of these titles are newspapers added to…
  • Old Music in Historical Newspapers: Tips for Finding Songs

    Mary Harrell-Sesniak
    24 Jul 2014 | 11:13 am
    Old Music in Historical Newspapers: Tips for Finding Songs was originally published at .Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this blog post, Mary provides newspaper search tips to find articles and musical scores about the songs our ancestors enjoyed When doing your family history research, have you ever wondered about the old music your American ancestors enjoyed? What were the popular melodies and tunes of earlier days, what were their origins, and what musical discoveries can we find in historical newspapers? Yankee…
  • Weird News of Odd & Bizarre Happenings: Raining Frogs?

    Thomas Jay Kemp
    23 Jul 2014 | 8:05 am
    Weird News of Odd & Bizarre Happenings: Raining Frogs? was originally published at .Census and other government records can give us dates and facts about our ancestors, but where do you turn to find their personal stories, an account of something fantastic, exciting or odd that they experienced? If you are lucky, you may possess your ancestors’ journals or family letters. Even if you don’t have these, however, you still have a great source for stories about your ancestors: an archive of historical newspapers, such as the 6,500 titles in GenealogyBank’s online Historical Newspaper…
  • Great-Grandmother’s Swimsuit in Vintage Fashion Articles & Photos

    Gena Philibert-Ortega
    22 Jul 2014 | 8:31 am
    Great-Grandmother’s Swimsuit in Vintage Fashion Articles & Photos was originally published at .Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this blog post, Gena searches old newspapers to find ads and stories about vintage swimsuits, giving us another glimpse into our ancestors’ lives. It’s HOT outside and it’s the perfect time to enjoy a day at the beach. One day as I was trying to stay cool at home with the air conditioning, I was scanning family photos and came across a 1920s-era photo of my great-grandfather and…
 
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