Personal History - Genealogy

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  • My Geneaholic Wednesday - 28 January 2015

    The Geneaholic
    28 Jan 2015 | 9:27 pm
    It was a pretty full genealogy day, interrupted only by a nap and dinner.*  Read email and blogs, then wrote Ping Pong Stars of 1956 -- Post 344 of (Not So) Wordless Wednesday and My "Beginning Computer Genealogy" OASIS Class is Mondays, March 9-30, 2015 and set it for later.*  Left at 11 a.m. for McDonalds for lunch, then the library to sit in on John's group then to the auditorium to attend the CVGS program.  Got a book, and headed home.*  Read, added to the Best Of post, and wrote Are You Reading the Geneapalooza Blog?  Looked at Facebook,…
  • What Historical Fashion Choices Say About Your Ancestors

    Ancestry Blog
    Betty Shubert
    29 Jan 2015 | 5:00 am
    Earlier this month, we put the call out to our Facebook community to submit photos for which they needed assistance dating with the help of historical fashion expert and author Betty Shubert. We received hundreds of submissions and Betty selected a few of her favorites.John Hobart JudsonPhoto Credit: Donna TrahanAt first glance, we see the bold, self-assured stance of a young boy. The fact that the photo’s owner identifies him as John Hobart Judson, confirms this initial observation. I notice the coat is buttoned right over left, which is the time-honored way that girls or women almost…
  • Boring or Brilliant?

    The Heart and Craft of Life Writing
    29 Jan 2015 | 1:57 pm
    The cliché of watching someone else’s home movies has always been “It’s always just a saddening bore.” What’s surprising is that the farther we find ourselves removed in time and place, the more these old films have the capacity to move us, to entertain us, or simply to remind us of life as it once was. From My Private Italy, Steve McCurdyAsk around and you’re bound to hear this sentiment about boredom expressed with regard to reading life stories written by “ordinary” people, especially strangers. You even hear it expressed by people about their own stories: “My life is so…
  • Ghosts of DNA Past: Irish Kings

    Origin Hunters - Genetic Genealogist
    28 Jan 2015 | 1:46 pm
       In 2006, Laoise T. Moore and the folks at Trinity College in Dublin published a paper famous for identifying the modal haplotype of Irish High King Niall of the Nine Hostages.  In their work, they used seventeen Y-DNA STR markers.  While time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) calculations have accuracy issues, having only 17 markers gives a common ancestor over 2,000 years ago.   What the Trinity folks really accomplished was the identification of Niall’s paternal ancestor from over 400 years earlier.  The media in 2006 had a field day in their…
  • Resolutions: Organizing Your Genealogy Research in 2015

    Ancestry Blog
    Ancestry Team
    26 Jan 2015 | 6:51 am
    This is a guest post by Denise May Levenick.Did you turn your calendar to a new year and vow to get your genealogy papers and files organized in 2015? January is National Organizing Month, and a great time to review, revamp, and reorganize so you can spend your time looking for ancestors instead of misplaced papers and files. Here is a week’s worth of strategies to help you move forward in conquering the information deluge.1. Clear Your DesktopIt can be hard to focus on the task at hand when your computer desktop is cluttered with files and folders. Instead of saving downloads and working…
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    Writing Your Life Story Blog

  • Jan 22, The Cause of Addiction May Be Very Different Than What You Think

    22 Jan 2015 | 5:16 pm
    There is no question that there is a problem with addiction in our societies. Alcohol, drug, gambling, sex and other obsessions affect a lot of people. But what really causes someone to become an addict? Is it the power of the chemicals? Or could it be a need to connect to something, a need the addict has not been able to fulfill in a healthy way? Some of the most interesting life stories, to me, are those of people who've battled addictions and found recovery.
  • Jan 21, Writing Your Life Story Can Improve Your Happiness

    21 Jan 2015 | 4:42 pm
    I've seen more than one article about the benefit of life writing narratives or keeping a journal. An article published on The New York Times (Writing Your Way to Happiness by Tara Parker-Pope) brings up the subject again. The author makes the point that writing about your life, and then (importantly) going back and revising it, helps you look more honestly at situations, challenges and experiences. And it can add to your well-being, positive outlook and even make you happier.
  • Jan 13, Your Perspective Frames Your Memoir

    13 Jan 2015 | 3:51 pm
    One of the definitions of perspective is "a particular attitude toward or way of regarding something; a point of view". When it comes to crafting a life story perspective is critical. Your point of view frames your memoir.
  • Jan 10, Perception of You

    10 Jan 2015 | 3:04 pm
    Here's looking at you. A new year often brings fresh starts and thoughts of how to improve and change our lives. I am making a commitment at the start of 2015 to look more at what helps us tell our life stories. One of the things I believe is essential is a driving purpose.
  • Jan 2, Your-Life-Your-Story - My Life Story Blog Archives, December, 2014

    2 Jan 2015 | 12:46 am
    An archive of previous My Life Story blog entries from December, 2014 regarding personal history, life story writing and more.
 
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    The Heart and Craft of Life Writing

  • Boring or Brilliant?

    29 Jan 2015 | 1:57 pm
    The cliché of watching someone else’s home movies has always been “It’s always just a saddening bore.” What’s surprising is that the farther we find ourselves removed in time and place, the more these old films have the capacity to move us, to entertain us, or simply to remind us of life as it once was. From My Private Italy, Steve McCurdyAsk around and you’re bound to hear this sentiment about boredom expressed with regard to reading life stories written by “ordinary” people, especially strangers. You even hear it expressed by people about their own stories: “My life is so…
  • Writing About Friends

    22 Jan 2015 | 12:48 pm
    Sooner or later most of us want to write stories about people who are or were special to us. These stories may be free-standing tributes, or you may include friends as characters in memoir stories. Some such stories work better than others. In fact, as much as I hate to say this, some can be downright boring, the exact opposite of what we intend. The boring stories are generally limited to an account of things you did together, which makes the story more about your experience than the friend. While it’s perfectly fine to write about shared experiences, it takes more to define a…
  • Jumpstart a Personal Timeline

    10 Jan 2015 | 3:35 am
    January is a great time to begin or update a personal timeline. If you are serious about lifestories or memoir, a timeline is invaluable for recalling story-worthy events and keeping your thread untangled. I have good news: a free download to simplify the process of starting or enhancing yours. Read on.On February 24, 2006, I published “The Value of a Personal Timeline” as my  ninth post on this blog I began that month. The material in that post has stood the test of time. It explains the basics of why you need one and how to get started. Rather than repeat what I said in that post,…
  • New Years Resolutions

    1 Jan 2015 | 12:45 pm
    Happy New Year!I spent considerable time crafting general writing resolutions (in no particular order) that I feel able to keep, but will also push me a bit. I invite you to shamelessly steal any or all that appeal to you. Some of my underlying thoughts:PRIMARY INTENTION: I want the concept of lighting a candle in the darkness to underlie everything I write. This is the first year I’ve stated a primary intention. It feels right write. Write what I want when I am ready. The emphasis here is on when. 2015 promises to be a challenging year of transition, and more than ever, I shall follow…
  • Pros and Cons of Disclosure

    18 Dec 2014 | 9:39 am
         “Gideon, how are you? I’ve been worrying about you.”     “Worrying? Why?”     “Because you–I don’t know, you always get into… adventures that never happen to anyone else. There isn’t anything wrong, is there?”     “Wrong?” He laughed. “No, of course not.” What was a bomb in the morning mail to the truly adventurous? Besides, why bring it up now when it couldn’t serve any purpose other than to worry her? Later was good enough. If there was going to be any comforting and soothing…
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    Ancestry Blog

  • Get Ready To Meet Your European Cousins with AncestryDNA

    Anna Swayne
    30 Jan 2015 | 6:28 am
    We’ve been counting down the days until AncestryDNA would be available outside the United States and it has finally arrived!The AncestryDNA database has grown to more than 700,000 people, and now that the test is available in the United Kingdom (UK) and Ireland, it will grow even faster with new possibilities for discovery on both sides of the pond.Here are four more reasons to be excited for the new launch of AncestryDNA tests in the UK and Ireland—even if you don’t live there.Meet your European cousins. Imagine getting a new DNA cousin match who is able to tell you more about the…
  • AncestryDNA Now Available in the United Kingdom and Ireland

    Brian Gallagher
    29 Jan 2015 | 2:08 pm
     We are excited to announce that AncestryDNA is now available to purchase in the United Kingdom and Ireland!We sold our first DNA kit in the U.S. in 2012, and since then, more than 700,000 people have used AncestryDNA to discover more about their family history. Now you can too.Why choose AncestryDNA?AncestryDNA is for everyone! For many people, DNA testing is a starting point that opens the doors to your family story. If you have already researched your family tree, it can provide evidence that supports your research and helps you break down brick walls in your family tree. Learn where…
  • What Historical Fashion Choices Say About Your Ancestors

    Betty Shubert
    29 Jan 2015 | 5:00 am
    Earlier this month, we put the call out to our Facebook community to submit photos for which they needed assistance dating with the help of historical fashion expert and author Betty Shubert. We received hundreds of submissions and Betty selected a few of her favorites.John Hobart JudsonPhoto Credit: Donna TrahanAt first glance, we see the bold, self-assured stance of a young boy. The fact that the photo’s owner identifies him as John Hobart Judson, confirms this initial observation. I notice the coat is buttoned right over left, which is the time-honored way that girls or women almost…
  • The Great Migration: How to Find Your African-Americans Ancestors

    Karin Berry
    28 Jan 2015 | 5:55 am
    This is a guest post by Karin Berry.During the Great Migration, 6 million African-Americans migrated to the North between 1910 to 1930. How can you trace their movement? It’s simple: Think like an immigrant.When the Great Migration, which occurred decades after slaves were freed, is approached as internal migration within the United States, it’s easy to apply the same methods as those used with immigrants from Europe. U.S. census records, birth, marriage and death certificates, military records, newspapers, and city directories, are great resources to start.This post is the…
  • Resolutions: Organizing Your Genealogy Research in 2015

    Ancestry Team
    26 Jan 2015 | 6:51 am
    This is a guest post by Denise May Levenick.Did you turn your calendar to a new year and vow to get your genealogy papers and files organized in 2015? January is National Organizing Month, and a great time to review, revamp, and reorganize so you can spend your time looking for ancestors instead of misplaced papers and files. Here is a week’s worth of strategies to help you move forward in conquering the information deluge.1. Clear Your DesktopIt can be hard to focus on the task at hand when your computer desktop is cluttered with files and folders. Instead of saving downloads and working…
 
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    The Geneaholic

  • My Geneaholic Thursday - 29 January 2015

    29 Jan 2015 | 9:30 pm
    This seems like a wasted day - I messed around too much and didn't get much done.  Eyes are really tired too.*  Read emails and blogs, then wrote Treasure Chest Thursday - Post 248: 1900 U.S. Census Record for Auble Family in Terre Haute, Indiana.*  Answered email, and tested the Ancestry beta more.  Joined the telecon at 10:45 a.m.*  After lunch, worked a bit in FindMyPast and FamilySearch Family Tree, but time got away somehow.  Checked Facebook too.  After trying to find something to write about, wrote Dear Randy: Why Do You Write About Your…
  • My Geneaholic Wednesday - 28 January 2015

    28 Jan 2015 | 9:27 pm
    It was a pretty full genealogy day, interrupted only by a nap and dinner.*  Read email and blogs, then wrote Ping Pong Stars of 1956 -- Post 344 of (Not So) Wordless Wednesday and My "Beginning Computer Genealogy" OASIS Class is Mondays, March 9-30, 2015 and set it for later.*  Left at 11 a.m. for McDonalds for lunch, then the library to sit in on John's group then to the auditorium to attend the CVGS program.  Got a book, and headed home.*  Read, added to the Best Of post, and wrote Are You Reading the Geneapalooza Blog?  Looked at Facebook,…
  • My Geneaholic Tuesday - 27 January 2015

    27 Jan 2015 | 10:06 pm
    Got some tasks done today, most importantly, downloading the RootsTech 2015 handouts.*  Read email and blogs, then wrote Tuesday's Tip - Search Ancestry.com Hints by Record Collection.  *  Worked a bit in FindMyPast with the beta Search fields - not much change actually, but what changed is an improvement.*  Added to the Best of post, then worked in WikiTree and wrote WikiTree Provides More DNA Information About Relatives.*  Downloaded over 150 syllabus articles for RootsTech, and put them in an Education file folder.  Need to review the content…
  • My Geneaholic Monday - 26 January 2015

    26 Jan 2015 | 9:54 pm
    Two more weeks and we're off to RootsTech.  I reorganized all of my blogger beads and nametags and ribbons today*  Read email and blogs, and noted that Amanuensis Monday - Post 253: Decree of Partition in Simon Gates (1739-1803) Estate posted.*  Joined Mondays With Myrt and discussed the Historic Map works overlay with Google Maps, and the need for transcriptions of records.  *  Noted that New or Updated FamilySearch Record Collections - January 19-25, 2015 posted and wrote January 28th CVGS Program Features Steve Andres on USS Midway Museum.
  • My Semi-Geneaholic Sunday - 25 January 2015

    25 Jan 2015 | 10:02 pm
    This was not a big genealogy day - my eyes were tired so I didn't sit all day in front of the computer.*  Read email and blogs, finished up the Best of the Genea-Blogs - 18 to 24 January 2015 post and we left for church after 9:30.*  Home by 11:30 to watch TV news, read the paper, and eat lunch.  Online to read, then worked two hours on the bank accounts and taxes.  Done for now, need more documents coming soon, I hope!*  Went in at 3:30 p.m. to watch TV, took a nap, and then watched the Pro Bowl while eating dinner.*  Online at 6:30 p.m. to read, then…
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    Before My Time

  • Did you hear about Hank's car?

    30 Jan 2015 | 9:37 am
    I've been working on a topical index for my current book project. Car stuff was newsworthy enough to make the local stringer's gossip column a century ago, and more than a dozen news bits in News: A Krentz & Buss Family Album are listed under the CARS topic. I got a little curious about this one from 1929:"Hank Buss was at the county capital last Thursday having some garage work done on his Blitzen Benz."What the heck is a Blitzen Benz?, I wondered, so of course I Googled it, thinking a picture might be a helpful addition to the book. After all, I'm from the Motor City, and if that was a…
  • A Coffee What?

    27 Jan 2015 | 11:06 am
    No doubt you've heard of a coffee klatsch. It's a social gathering wherein the guests partake of coffee and gossip... um, I mean, you know, conversation. The term comes from the German Kaffeeklatsch: Kaffee--yes, you're right, that part means coffee--see? you know some German already--plus Klatsch, which means slap, smack, pop, crack of a whip, or gossip. (Oh, did you think gossip was harmless?) Klatsch can also be used to refer to the person who gossips: a fly-flap or babbler. See, I did not make that up! It came directly from The Classic Series German-English Dictionary published in 1926 by…
  • Anemoia: Nostalgia For A Time You’ve Never Known

    24 Jan 2015 | 5:22 am
    I am a huge fan of John Koenig, who invents words for things there should be words for. My genealogically-inclined friends are sure to recognize the need for this one: On his Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows Facebook page, John comments on the roots of his words. This one, for example, he explains thus:ETYMOLOGY: From Greek anemos, "wind" + noos "mind." It's a psychological corollary to anemosis, which is a condition in the wood of some trees in which the wood is warped and the rings are separated by the action of high winds upon the trunk. In anemoia, the sheer force of time warps something in…
  • Notes from The White County Democrat, 1925

    15 Dec 2014 | 4:00 am
    Ed. note: I spent a good portion of 1997-98 at the library every day after work reeling through inter-library-loaned microfilmed weekly newspapers, The White County Democrat (Indiana) and The Sheldon Progress (North Dakota) from the first three decades of the 1900s, taking notes on anything I saw that pertained to my extended Krentz/Krintz family and anyone else related by marriage. I ended up with three legal pads full of notes along with a stack of articles I printed out because they were too long to transcribe by hand. Currently, I'm transcribing these notes for inclusion in a book,…
  • Notes from The White County Democrat, 1924

    13 Dec 2014 | 4:00 am
    The White County Democrat, Friday, April 11, 19244 January 1924:     Reynolds: Frances Krintz returned to Fort Wayne Monday after spending the week here visiting her father.     Reynolds: Michael Krintz who has been in poor health for some time, is not expected to live.     Reynolds: James Firth and George Krintz went to Akron, Ohio Tuesday.11 January 1924:     Michael Krintz died January 7, 1924. He was born in Prussia, Germany, October 26, 1836. When a young man he came to this country and went to Wisconsin, but…
 
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    oral history - Google News

  • The 2014 Patriots: An Oral History - Boston Globe

    30 Jan 2015 | 3:17 pm
    The 2014 Patriots: An Oral HistoryBoston GlobeThe 2014 Patriots: An Oral History. 1. Great Expectations. Even before the first ball was kicked off, the 2014 Patriots season was about one thing: Winning the franchise's fourth Super Bowl title. Now, the team is 60 minutes away from achieving that goal.
  • An Oral History of Grassroots Venezuelans in the Midst of the Economic War - Venezuelanalysis.com

    30 Jan 2015 | 2:35 am
    An Oral History of Grassroots Venezuelans in the Midst of the Economic WarVenezuelanalysis.comIn this oral history collage, members of the Venezuelan grassroots and popular movements speak for themselves about the roots of the economic war, their strategies in the face of it, and the solutions that they propose. The following interviews were and more »
  • Aboriginal folklore could be oldest accurate oral history in the world - Daily Mail

    28 Jan 2015 | 5:20 am
    Daily MailAboriginal folklore could be oldest accurate oral history in the worldDaily MailTraditional stories passed down through generations by Australian Aborigines may be among the oldest accurate oral histories in the world, scientists have claimed. The findings have allowed them to map how the continent may have looked around 10,000 ...
  • An oral history of one of Chapel Hill's darkest days - The Daily Tar Heel

    25 Jan 2015 | 10:39 pm
    The Daily Tar HeelAn oral history of one of Chapel Hill's darkest daysThe Daily Tar HeelAn oral history of one of Chapel Hill's darkest days. By Jordan Nash | Published 01/26/15 1:34am williamson_4. In 1995 a UNC law student shot and killed two people on Henderson Street. Orange County emergency medical professionals transport the body ...and more »
  • Building community and ecoliteracy through oral history - OUPblog (blog)

    23 Jan 2015 | 5:43 am
    Building community and ecoliteracy through oral historyOUPblog (blog)For our second blog post of 2015, we're looking back at a great article from Katie Kuszmar in The Oral History Review (OHR), “From Boat to Throat: How Oral Histories Immerse Students in Ecoliteracy and Community Building” (OHR, 41.2.) In the article
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    StoryCorps

  • StoryCorps 411: The Ballad of Wendell Scott

    NPR
    30 Jan 2015 | 7:26 pm
    On January 30, 2015 Wendell Scott became the first African American driver to be inducted into the NASCAR Hall of Fame.Scott started racing in 1952 toward the end of the Jim Crow era, and was the first African American to win at NASCAR’s elite major league level.Scott’s family served as his racing team. They traveled to speedways together from their home in Danville, Virginia, and his sons worked as his pit crew.Wendell Scott died in 1990. One of his sons, Frank, and his grandson Warrick, sat down to remember him for StoryCorps.On January 30, 2015 Wendell Scott became the first…
  • StoryCorps 410: Standing with a Giant

    NPR
    26 Jan 2015 | 7:18 am
    In his early 20s, Max Starkloff was in a near fatal car accident, which left him quadriplegic and living in a nursing home. One day he came across a young woman who worked there, named Colleen. At StoryCorps in St. Louis, Colleen Kelly Starkloff sat down with her daughter, Meaghan Starkloff Breitenstein, to remember him. Hear more stories at StoryCorps.org. Write to the participants at podcast@storycorps.org. Tell us about someone you want to interview at characters@storycorps.org. And help support our work at StoryCorps.org/donate.Music Info: "Jubilee" by Unwed Sailor"The…
  • StoryCorps 409: The Come Back

    NPR
    12 Jan 2015 | 3:24 pm
    When Darlene Lewis' son was released from prison 20 years ago, he couldn't find work.So, Darlene decided to do something about it. She runs an organization dedicated to helping former inmates find jobs. Darlene prepares them for interviews, places them with local businesses, and advocates for them in court. She's helped thousands of men and women — including James Taylor, who served seven years for weapons possession and drug charges. Today, James works as a videographer, youth mentor, and also volunteers for Darlene's organization.They spoke at StoryCorps.Hear more stories…
  • StoryCorps 408: How We Roll

    NPR
    2 Jan 2015 | 2:44 pm
    In July 2014, Raphael Hameed was walking with his 5-year-old son, Ish, when they were hit by a speeding car. Raphael lost his leg. Ish, his only son, was killed.While the driver is awaiting trial for vehicular homicide, her sister, Megiddëh Goldston, is trying to do right by the Hameed family.They connected after the accident. And now she visits Raphael and his wife, Heidi, to help with their day-to day-life. They sat down for StoryCorps in Colorado Springs.Hear more stories at StoryCorps.org. Write to the participants at podcast@storycorps.org. Tell us about someone you want to…
  • StoryCorps 407: Top Secret Santa

    NPR
    19 Dec 2014 | 1:34 pm
    Terri Van Keuren, Richard Shoup and Pamela Farrell remember how their father, Air Force Colonel Harry Shoup, started the holiday tradition of tracking Santa Claus on U.S. military radar in 1955.Hear more stories at StoryCorps.org. Write to the participants at podcast@storycorps.org. Help support our work at StoryCorps.org/donate.Music in this episode:Sleigh Ride by The Ventures - http://www.theventures.comFives by Podington Bear- http://podingtonbear.com
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    Brooklyn Historical Society Blog

  • Photo of the Week: Blizzard?

    Tess Colwell
    28 Jan 2015 | 2:30 am
    [People in the street after the blizzard, Atlantic Avenue and Flatbush Avenue], March 15, 1888, V1974.7.77; Adrian Vanderveer Martense collection, ARC.191, Brooklyn Historical Society.Brooklyn is covered in snow this week! Pictured above is from the Blizzard of 1888, which hit New York City by surprise in March, with over 21 inches of snow. The New York Times reported on Tuesday, March 13, 1888, “It had a power of slinging the snow into doorways and packing it up against the doors; of sifting it through window frames of piling it up in high drifts at street corners, of twirling it into hard…
 
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    All about family!

  • 中華鍋の振り方!2つのコツとは?動画でプロの手さばきを学ぼう!

    こっこ
    28 Jan 2015 | 2:11 pm
    プロの料理人が、って、 惚れ惚れしますよね~! 動画の最後の方は、チャーハンがまるで液体のように、 なめらかに空中を舞って・・・まさに こんな風にチャチャッと、 かっこよく鍋を振ってみたいですよね!(〃ノ∀`〃) もちろん、プロの料理人は、長年修行をしてこられたから、 ここまでできるわけなのですが、今回は、そんなプロの手さばきから学ぶ、 について、見て行きたいと思います。 家庭でも、と…
  • 中華鍋のお手入れ!さびちゃった時はどうする?これで完全復活!

    こっこ
    27 Jan 2015 | 4:43 am
    しばらく使っていなかった、中華鍋を出してみたら、 が・・! ∑(゚□゚;) ちゃんとお手入れして保管していたつもりだけど、 やっぱり鉄の中華鍋って、毎日使った方がいいのね~ ・・と、後悔しても後の祭り(T_T) 今日、中華鍋を使う予定なんだけど、 この錆、クレンザーで磨いて取っちゃっていいんだろうか? でも、下手に磨いたりすると、鍋が傷つきそうだし・・ どうしたらいい? って、あるのかな? 今回は、を、…
  • 中華鍋の正しいお手入れ方法!洗剤で洗っちゃいけないってホント?

    こっこ
    25 Jan 2015 | 2:00 pm
    って、お手入れが難しそうで、 とっつきにくい印象が、ありますよね。 確かに、すごく重いし、ちょっとお手入れを怠ると、 焦げ付いたり、錆びが発生したり・・┐(´~`;)┌  おまけに、 洗剤を使わずに、汚れがちゃんと落ちるの? って・・? せっかくの鉄の中華鍋を、大切に長く使うために、 今回はそんな疑問を、解決したいと思います。 最後に、洗剤で洗ってしまった時の対処法と、…
  • 中華鍋の空焼き方法!失敗しないための3つのコツとは?

    こっこ
    24 Jan 2015 | 12:55 pm
    新しく手に入れた、! 鉄製の鍋って、使う前にが必要らしいんだけど・・ なんだか大変そう(>__
  • 中華鍋の選び方!おすすめは?長持ちするのはやっぱり鉄製?

    こっこ
    21 Jan 2015 | 1:11 pm
    プロの料理人が、中華鍋を豪快に振っていたかと思ったら、 黄金色にツヤツヤ光った、パラッパラののできあがり! そんな光景をテレビで見ちゃうと、 、欲しくなりますよね~(*´▽`*) 私、普段は、でチャーハンを作っているんですが、 どうしても、中華料理屋で出てくるような、 あのツヤツヤ!パラッパラ!が、実現できなくって・・ 料理の腕次第だよ!と言われそうですが・・( ;∀;) でも、中華鍋があれば、…
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    Origin Hunters - Genetic Genealogist

  • Ghosts of DNA Past: Irish Kings

    28 Jan 2015 | 1:46 pm
       In 2006, Laoise T. Moore and the folks at Trinity College in Dublin published a paper famous for identifying the modal haplotype of Irish High King Niall of the Nine Hostages.  In their work, they used seventeen Y-DNA STR markers.  While time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) calculations have accuracy issues, having only 17 markers gives a common ancestor over 2,000 years ago.   What the Trinity folks really accomplished was the identification of Niall’s paternal ancestor from over 400 years earlier.  The media in 2006 had a field day in their…
  • Atrocities and Assimilation: Crusader DNA in the Near East

    8 Dec 2014 | 5:04 am
       This paper got its start back in February of this year while I was researching R1b-DF100 for my posting, The Third Brother.  Among the data, primarily Western European haplotypes, was a single Armenian record.  The R1b-L11>DF100 group that I was working with had as one of their theories that L11 was a fairly recent, 3,000 to 4,000 years, arrival from the Near East and that the Armenian record was part of that evidence.  I looked at the Armenian record, ran a phylogenetic test on it, the L11 group and some similar Near East records.  The Armenian record fell…
  • DNA Convergence and Chicken Little

    5 Dec 2014 | 4:04 am
       For me, the topic of convergence in yDNA first came up early in 2014.  I had just posted a paper and one of the comments was – “What about convergence?”  I said to myself, “What convergence?”  I admit I had to look up the topic.Convergence: A term used in genetic genealogy to describe the process whereby two different haplotypes mutate over time to become identical or near identical resulting in an accidental or coincidental match. - Turner A & Smolenyak M 2004.My response back to the comment was - “All of the haplotypes in my paper are…
  • DNA, SNP, STR, OMG!

    2 Dec 2014 | 2:09 pm
    (Originally published May 2014 in Going In-Depth)   Oh my gosh, there are many acronyms in genetic genealogy.  You have to agree that using the acronym DNA is better than writing deoxyribonucleic acid repeatedly.  Although, when we talk about using DNA for genealogy and we only use acronyms, they start to lose their meaning and become just another ‘thing’.  “Hey, I’ve got a SNP.  Do you have a SNP?”  “I dunno, let me check.”  Maybe I’m weird.  I like to understand what all the acronyms mean and how they play a part in the larger…
  • DNA Mysteries: Iberian R1b-V88 in Africa

    24 Sep 2014 | 5:28 am
       When I first heard about R1b in Africa, my immediate assumption was that the predominantly Celtic haplogroup must have been a recent transplant.  I ran some of the V88 haplotypes against the big databases (FTDNA & ySearch) expecting to see matches to European men within the African colonial timeframe.  It wasn’t that easy.  Common ancestor analysis put the R1b Africans (V88) thousands of years removed from the rest of their European R1b cousins.  Where did they come from?  How did they get there?   I started with the given that the R1b…
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    emptynestancestry.com

  • Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 Jan 2015.

    Christine Blythe
    30 Jan 2015 | 12:45 pm
    Following are the recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions up to 30 Jan 2015.   FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions Argentina Argentina, National Census, 1895 Canada Nova Scotia Delayed Births, 1837-1904 El Salvador El Salvador Civil Registration, 1704-1977 Philippines Philippines, Manila, Civil Registration, 1899-1994 United States California, Immigration Registers of Japanese, Filipinos, and Hawaiians at […]
  • The best free archives online.

    Jessy Troy
    28 Jan 2015 | 8:42 am
    The Internet is an incredible source of information, a lot of it collected by some of the best free archives online. You may be thinking to yourself, “Well, duh…thank you for that insight, Captain Obvious.” But I think people fail to realize just how massive the scope of the web really is. Do me a […]
  • Have your valuable family photos scanned free at RootsTech 2015.

    Christine Blythe
    24 Jan 2015 | 12:50 pm
    RootsTech 2015 provides the opportunity to have your valuable family photos scanned free to preserve history and memories. In my recent post on my blog, “Feathering the Empty Nest“, titled “Photos and images are essential to successful genealogy research and blogging,” I outlined several options available for using photos and images to increase readership and engagement in […]
  • Prince William’s mitochondrial line is of Indian ancestry?

    Christine Blythe
    20 Jan 2015 | 6:21 am
    My children’s ancestry branches backward into history, through Welsh Quakers immigrants in Pennsylvania, to Welsh royalty and then to British royalty, including Prince William. It was surprising to learn Prince William’s mitochondrial line is of Indian ancestry? The result of these connections is that my husband and children are distantly related (20th cousins 4 times […]
  • Photos and images are essential to successful genealogy research and blogging.

    Christine Blythe
    18 Jan 2015 | 12:19 pm
    My two main passions in life are my genealogy research and blogging, and photos and images are essential to the success of both. Most of us do this for the love of the craft – and yes, it is a craft that takes a great deal of talent, research, and knowledge of available resources to […]
 
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    blog.genealogybank.com

  • Captain Alden Howell: Last Confederate Officer

    Thomas Jay Kemp
    30 Jan 2015 | 8:33 am
    Captain Alden Howell: Last Confederate Officer was originally published at .When Alden Howell passed away in 1947 at the age of 106, he was the last surviving commissioned officer of the Army of the Confederate States of America. San Luis Obispo Daily Telegram (San Luis Obispo, California), 21 March 1947, page 9 It’s a good thing that there were multiple obituaries about this centenarian. Each historical obit gives us more of the details of his life. For example, see this old obituary in the Greensboro Record. Greensboro Record (Greensboro, North Carolina), 21 March 1947, page 10 We learn…
  • January 2015 Update: GenealogyBank Just Added 8 Million Records!

    Tony Pettinato
    29 Jan 2015 | 8:52 am
    January 2015 Update: GenealogyBank Just Added 8 Million Records! was originally published at .Every day, GenealogyBank is working hard to digitize more U.S. newspapers and obituaries, expanding our burgeoning collection to give you the largest newspaper archives for family history research available online from the 1600s up to today. We’re getting off to a great start this 2015, just completing the addition of 8 million more U.S. genealogy records, vastly increasing our content coverage from coast to coast! Here are some of the details about our most recent U.S. newspaper additions: A total…
  • Snow & Ice: Winter’s Frosty Fun

    Duncan Kuehn
    28 Jan 2015 | 8:54 am
    Snow & Ice: Winter’s Frosty Fun was originally published at .Introduction: Duncan Kuehn is a professional genealogist with over eight years of client experience. She has worked on several well-known projects, such as “Who Do You Think You Are?” and researching President Barack Obama’s ancestry. With the East Coast (especially Boston) digging out from yesterday’s blizzard, this seems like a good time for an article about winter. In this blog post, Duncan searches old newspapers to find poems and photos about our ancestors enjoying winter activities. Some people love winter and…
  • Congratulations! FamilySearch.org Celebrates 120 Years

    Thomas Jay Kemp
    27 Jan 2015 | 8:28 am
    Congratulations! FamilySearch.org Celebrates 120 Years was originally published at .FamilySearch International recently observed the 120th anniversary of the formation of its forerunner, the Genealogical Society of Utah. FamilySearch is the largest worldwide Internet genealogy service in the world. For more details, read the full article at “FamilySearch Celebrates 120 Years.” Source: FamilySearch The Genealogical Society of Utah was formed in 1894 by Wilford Woodruff (1807-1898), a native of Connecticut, to help the residents of Utah “to seek out their ancestors and preserve their…
  • Michigan Archives: 148 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

    Tony Pettinato
    26 Jan 2015 | 8:59 am
    Michigan Archives: 148 Newspapers for Genealogy Research was originally published at .On 26 January 1837 Michigan was admitted into the Union as the 26th state, doubling the nation’s original total of 13. Located in the Great Lakes region, Michigan (including the Upper Peninsula) is America’s largest state east of the Mississippi River, and the 9th most populous state in the U.S. Photo: Upper Falls, Tahquamenon Falls State Park, Michigan. Credit: Attila Nagy; Wikimedia Commons. If you are researching your family roots in Michigan, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online MI newspaper…
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    Radaris

  • Man Finds Long-Lost Family In An Unusual Way

    radaris
    30 Jan 2015 | 9:12 am
    Earlier this month John Murphy, a resident of Bradford UK, made contact with an American branch of his family that he hadn’t spoken to in years. It all began while he was on a vacation in the New York area and traced his roots on his mother’s side to locate a great uncle who had […]
  • Family History Mini-Infographic

    radaris
    26 Jan 2015 | 6:56 am
    Although genealogy is reportedly the second most popular hobby in the United states, a majority of Americans are still uninformed about their past. Whether they lack the time necessary for in-depth ancestry research or feel overwhelmed by the sheer amount of family history data available both on and offline, over 80% of Americans feel they […]
  • 4 Ways to Increase Privacy on Social Media

    radaris
    19 Jan 2015 | 9:13 am
    Social media platforms are rapidly becoming one of the most popular and convenient ways to interact with friends, family, and strangers across the globe. In 2014 the Pew Research Center reported that 74% of adults had at least one social media profile and that in coming years those numbers were likely to rise. With so […]
  • Long Lost Friends Found Living Next Door

    radaris
    16 Jan 2015 | 9:40 am
    After being drafted during the Vietnam war and going through basic training together, Dave Brown and Roger Watson never saw each other again.   Well that all changed 40 years later when Roger befriended one of his neighbors that shared an adjacent backyard. Peggy Brown and Roger exchanged neighborly conversation and, over time, Peggy learned […]
  • Cell Phone Safety For Kids

    radaris
    14 Jan 2015 | 11:17 am
    As technology advances and innovations like cellphones become a necessity to everyday life, many parents are asking themselves if their children are ready for their first mobile devices much earlier than they had expected. Approximately 20% of 3rd graders and 78% of teens in middle school have their own cell phones, indicating that the average […]
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    Researching Relatives

  • Bold Escape from Pittsburgh's Allegheny County Jail

    Joanne Cowden
    30 Jan 2015 | 6:00 am
    On this day in 1902, two brothers escaped from the Allegheny County Jail in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. John and Edward Biddle were in prison for the murder of a grocer on Mt. Washington, the neighborhood where my relatives were living at that time.The Daily Republican (Monongahela, Pennsylvania), January 30, 1902While the crime itself was high-profile, when the warden's wife helped the brothers escape from prison after falling in love with Ed, it became a sensational news event. Even decades later, it was considered fascinating enough for a movie about the event to be produced: Mrs.
  • Did the Entire Family Disappear?

    Joanne Cowden
    28 Jan 2015 | 6:00 am
    I'm sure we've all searched census records and had the experience where we couldn't find the person or family anywhere. I've browsed entire neighborhoods page by page, looking for someone and never finding them. Did they move? Were they away from home, or not want to share their information with the census taker? In some cases, there could be other reasons.If you were looking for William McClease and his wife Isabelle in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, you would find them living in Upper St. Clair Township in 1870:        William McClease, 37, Laborer, born in PA …
  • Canadian Connection: My Ancestors in Ontario

    Joanne Cowden
    26 Jan 2015 | 5:30 am
    Most of my ancestors seem to be from Germany and France so, because it's so different than the rest, one of the family branches that stands out for me is my Baker line. John Baker was born in England and Elizabeth Arthur was Irish. They both made their way to Canada and settled in Seneca, Haldimand County, Ontario. (I still don't know if they were already married and arrived together, or met in Canada.)Six of their nine children, including my 2nd great-grandmother Mary Baker, were born in Canada:Sushannah Baker, b. 1853Mary Baker, b. 1855Thomas Baker, b. 1857George Baker, b.
  • She Died at Pittsburgh's Columbia Hospital

    Joanne Cowden
    24 Jan 2015 | 6:00 am
    My husband's 2nd great-grandmother, Nancy Gamble Kirkendall, died on this day in 1918. She lived in Saltsburg, Indiana County, Pennsylvania,  but was admitted to Columbia Hospital in the Wilkinsburg area of Pittsburgh for gallstone surgery. She died a few days after the operation.Nancy was a 75-year-old widow who had lost her husband a few years earlier in 1915 due to a terrible accident. Thomas Roland Kirkendall was riding a horse home to Saltsburg from his farm in Avonmore, Westmoreland County, when he was struck by a speeding car and died of a skull fracture.I don't know much about…
  • Consider Catholic Newspaper Archives

    Joanne Cowden
    21 Jan 2015 | 6:00 am
    We know how important newspaper research is for learning more about our ancestors' lives. For those of you with Catholic relatives, there's a list compiled by the Catholic Research Resources Alliance that you may find helpful. It includes various Catholic newspapers from both the U.S. and Canada.The Pittsburgh Catholic, February 20, 1913: "The management earnestly solicit your interest and assistance in the cause of the homeless boys sheltered at theProtectory. If in need of an office or errand boy, apply at the Institution."My great-uncle Peter LaFianza, whom I was lucky…
 
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    Forces War Records Blog

  • Yesterday, 28th January 1942, RAF Fighter ‘ace’ Robert Stanford-Tuck was shot down over France.

    29 Jan 2015 | 8:00 am
    Post-war research has shown that there were only 17 British or Allied pilots in the whole of World War Two that shot down 10 or more enemy aircraft; Robert Stanford-Tuck was one of these. Thanks to his daring aerial exploits, not to mention his even more daring escape from a German POW camp, he is one of the best-known of all British fighter pilots.
  • Fleeing the Holocaust to the safety of Wales

    27 Jan 2015 | 5:37 am
    Czechoslovakia was not a good place for a Jewish child to be. Occupied months before the Second World War, home to the first specially created Jewish Ghetto and liberated only at the war’s end, living there did not bode well for their survival. Exceedingly lucky, then, the 669 Czechoslovakian children who spent their war in the Welsh hills thanks to Nicholas Winton’s life-saving trains.
  • 50 Years since the Death of Churchill

    23 Jan 2015 | 7:04 am
    This Saturday, 24th January, marks 50 years since the death of Winston Churchill, the man credited with winning World War Two for Britain with his strong leadership and fiery determination. Here we have a contemporary account of his funeral, taken from our Historic Documents archive.
  • Operation Compass and the fight for Tobruk

    22 Jan 2015 | 6:01 am
    On this day, 22nd January 1941, Tobruk fell to the Allies. The Italians had more men, more arms and had had longer to set up in the desert than the British Army; so why were they still driven out?
  • First Zeppelin attack on British soil

    19 Jan 2015 | 8:19 am
    On 19th January, 1915, the first German Zeppelin raid on civilians took place. It was to be just the first of 54 raids by these lumbering, but still deeply unsettling, aerial predators.
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    Fold3 Blog| Fold3 Blog

  • Civil War Horse Soldier Artifacts Collection

    Trevor
    18 Jan 2015 | 7:00 am
    One of our newest collections on Fold3 is The Civil War Horse Soldier Artifacts Collection. Like the title suggests, this collection contains images of Civil War artifacts from the Horse Solider antique store in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Many of the artifacts are photographs of soldiers, but there are also some images of weapons—like guns and swords—as well as images of belts, drill and tactics manuals, official documents, letters, medals, uniforms, cartridge boxes, mess kits, and other personal effects. Most artifacts included in the collection are accompanied by a detailed written…
  • Creation of the Seabees: January 5, 1942

    Trevor
    1 Jan 2015 | 7:30 am
    January 5 marks the day in 1942 that Rear Admiral Ben Moreell was given authorization to create the Seabees, the naval force that would carry out an astonishingly diverse array of construction tasks at home and abroad for the Navy during World War II. The creation of the Seabees (short for Construction Battalions) was deemed essential following America’s entrance into the war, when it became clear that, rather than continuing to use civilian contractors who couldn’t defend themselves against enemy attack, the navy needed military men to build bases, landing strips, and so on in…
  • 150th Anniversary (1865–2015) This Month in the Civil War: Fall of Fort Fisher

    Trevor
    1 Jan 2015 | 7:00 am
    On January 15, 1865, Fort Fisher, in North Carolina, fell after a three-day combined land-and-sea assault by Union troops. In December, Union major general Benjamin Butler had tried to bring down the Confederate fort (known as the “Gibraltar of the South” for its defenses) with the assistance of Rear Admiral David D. Porter but had aborted his attack. Butler was replaced with Major General Alfred H. Terry, who, along with Porter, tried again in January to take the fort, which sat on a peninsula guarding the river entrance to Wilmington, North Carolina, the last major Confederate…
  • Unbroken: 307th Bomb Group Records

    Trevor
    22 Dec 2014 | 1:40 pm
    Though you’re probably unfamiliar with the 307th Bomb Group, you may have heard of one of its members: Louis Zamperini, whose World War II survival story is the subject of the popular book Unbroken, by Laura Hillenbrand, and the new film of the same title, directed by Angelina Jolie. If Unbroken has sparked your interest about Zamperini’s life, Fold3’s 307th Bomb Group Records (part of our Contributed Military Group Records collection) gives you access to some fascinating documents related to his life. A three-part article from 1945 detailing Zamperini’s amazing story of…
  • 150th Anniversary (1864–2014) This Month in the Civil War: Battle of Nashville

    Trevor
    4 Dec 2014 | 1:25 pm
    Following the Battle of Franklin, which had devastated John Bell Hood‘s Confederate forces, Hood pursued the Union troops to Nashville, where they had joined with those of George H. Thomas. Now vastly outnumbered, Hood’s battered Army of Tennessee took a defensive position parallel to the Union lines on December 2, 1864, and waited for the Union attack. Thomas finally began his offensive on December 15. He directed part of his troops to attack Hood’s right, while the majority of his forces were sent in a wheeling maneuver to smash into Hood’s left flank. The plan…
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