Personal History - Genealogy

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  • Tracing ‘Titanic’ Genealogy: Survivor Passenger Lists & More

    blog.genealogybank.com
    Gena Philibert-Ortega
    15 Apr 2014 | 9:16 am
    Tracing ‘Titanic’ Genealogy: Survivor Passenger Lists & More was originally published at .Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this guest blog post, Gena searches old newspapers to find out more about the tragedy of the sinking of the Titanic—and shows how helpful those articles can be with your own family history research. The Titanic was fast sinking. After she went down the cries were horrible. This was at 2:20 a.m. by a man’s watch who stood next to me. At this time three other boats and ours kept…
  • Not a trick question

    personal-history « WordPress.com Tag Feed
    gregadamyork
    25 Mar 2014 | 11:04 am
    gregadamyork:For many years I sought the answer to this question. Only recently am I coming to accep
  • Apr 17, Tough Family Stories That Redeem

    Writing Your Life Story Blog
    17 Apr 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Sometimes we have stories in our families that are really hard to talk about. Therefore, they are hard to write. People want to keep those skeletons in the closet. But as another personal historian loves to say, bring those skeletons out of the closet and make them dance! A recent NY Times story is a great example of a tough family story that ultimately redeems.
  • Thoughts on the Writing Process

    The Heart and Craft of Life Writing
    14 Apr 2014 | 10:34 am
    Today’s post is part of a group effort. Last week in a guest post on Linda Austin's blog, Moonbridgebooks.com, I was invited by Mary Gottschalk, author of the memoir, Sailing Down the Moonbeamand a forthcoming novel to join a collective discussion on personal aspects of the writing processes. I found the questions useful in clarifying my thoughts on this matter and urge all writers to do likewise. 1) What am I working on? I’m dabbling in flash memoir. I’ve spent the last few months intensively studying techniques for evoking emotion in readers, and one key concept that snapped sharply…
  • Probate in the United Kingdom: An Overview

    Ancestry.com Blog
    Abbie Lee Black
    18 Apr 2014 | 5:40 pm
    After finding your ancestors in civil registration, census records, and parish registers, there are many different record types that are widely available for the UK. When I’m doing research, I usually look for probate records, and specifically wills, of my ancestors at this stage in the research process. UK Wills and Probate Before 1858Probate is the term for how a court distributes the estate of a deceased person. It was not required by law for people to create a will, but quite a bit of the population is covered by wills to make them a good genealogical resource. If your ancestor did…
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    Writing Your Life Story Blog

  • Apr 17, Tough Family Stories That Redeem

    17 Apr 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Sometimes we have stories in our families that are really hard to talk about. Therefore, they are hard to write. People want to keep those skeletons in the closet. But as another personal historian loves to say, bring those skeletons out of the closet and make them dance! A recent NY Times story is a great example of a tough family story that ultimately redeems.
  • Apr 14, Boston Strong Marathon Runner Shalane Flanagan

    14 Apr 2014 | 6:24 pm
    Tomorrow is the one year anniversary of the tragic bombing that shook Boston at their iconic Marathon Race finish line. A year later and there is a hometown favorite who has a real chance of winning the women's division of this year's Boston Marathon (set for Monday, April 21). Shalane Flanagan, profiled on CBS' 60 Minutes, has running in her genes.
  • Apr 12, Falling "in love"

    11 Apr 2014 | 10:21 pm
    Falling in love... The mystery of falling in love happened to me in the beginning of the nineties when I met a dear soul-companion. Mostly called a
  • Apr 7, Modern Day North Pole Adventure

    7 Apr 2014 | 7:38 pm
    Two men, a dozen sled dogs, a couple of tents, no bath for 30 days and K-rations. Mark Andresen, cofounder of personal history website, Imastory, isn't just a tech wizard; he's a real life adventurer! He's currently on an "old school" trip to the North Pole.
  • Apr 3, Your-Life-Your-Story - My Life Story Blog Archives, March, 2014

    3 Apr 2014 | 5:31 pm
    An archive of previous My Life Story blog entries from March, 2014 regarding personal history, life story writing and more.
 
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    The Heart and Craft of Life Writing

  • Thoughts on the Writing Process

    14 Apr 2014 | 10:34 am
    Today’s post is part of a group effort. Last week in a guest post on Linda Austin's blog, Moonbridgebooks.com, I was invited by Mary Gottschalk, author of the memoir, Sailing Down the Moonbeamand a forthcoming novel to join a collective discussion on personal aspects of the writing processes. I found the questions useful in clarifying my thoughts on this matter and urge all writers to do likewise. 1) What am I working on? I’m dabbling in flash memoir. I’ve spent the last few months intensively studying techniques for evoking emotion in readers, and one key concept that snapped sharply…
  • Memoir with Recipes

    7 Apr 2014 | 6:01 am
    Although few things bond people like food and sharing recipes, I didn’t intend to include recipes in my mini-memoir, Adventures of a Chilehead,for several reasons: 1) Some of the stories are set in restaurants and I couldn’t include recipes for those. 2) Recipes for things like frijoles, chile con carne and enchiladas are easily found on the web. 3) When I cook, I use recipes as mere suggestions and cook by the seat of my pants based mostly on what’s in the kitchen at any given time. How do you write recipes for that? 4) Some ingredients, like chile powder, are unreliable in strength.
  • Which Memory is Real?

    24 Mar 2014 | 10:20 am
    Everyone knows how memory dims and darkens with time. Yesterday I began writing about a memory from the summer after first grade when I felt “outside the circle.” I'd written  about this incident before, but decided to begin fresh. After five paragraphs I could see no further benefit in continuing the rewrite and tracked down a version from five years ago, intending to graft in some of that material. When I read the earlier story, my jaw dropped. The theme was the same, the other main character was the same, but circumstances were quite different. Yesterday's  story begins as I…
  • Eternal Optimists Piss Me Off

    16 Mar 2014 | 2:07 pm
    At the risk of sounding judgmental (how human would that be?) I’ve got to admit that when I continually hear nothing but rosy accounts from the same person, I grow suspicious, even angry at times. For example, an elderly woman I knew many years ago never had anything but the kindest, nicest things to say about people, even about people I found monstrously arrogant or rude. She was always smiling and cheerful, even in her nineties when I knew she had aches, pains, and countless physical problems and not everyone treated her well. By her account, people were always delightful, and her…
  • Reading and Writing Across the Gender Divide

    10 Mar 2014 | 7:26 am
    I just read Pittsburgh author Dave Newman’s story, “Asteroids Falling Up,” in The New Yinzer, a fine online literary magazine  published here in Pittsburgh. My eyeballs occasionally bulged as I read this risqué coming of age piece. This story punched windows into walls of reticence as I read. Perhaps, I thought, I can write more boldly – on other topics. Whether fiction or memoir, Newman’s compelling story would not ring true or have such impact had he toned down or skirted his topic. I mention this story, this experience, to illustrate the value of reading across the gender…
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    Ancestry.com Blog

  • Probate in the United Kingdom: An Overview

    Abbie Lee Black
    18 Apr 2014 | 5:40 pm
    After finding your ancestors in civil registration, census records, and parish registers, there are many different record types that are widely available for the UK. When I’m doing research, I usually look for probate records, and specifically wills, of my ancestors at this stage in the research process. UK Wills and Probate Before 1858Probate is the term for how a court distributes the estate of a deceased person. It was not required by law for people to create a will, but quite a bit of the population is covered by wills to make them a good genealogical resource. If your ancestor did…
  • Pennsylvania Death Certificates Now Available

    Amy Johnson Crow
    18 Apr 2014 | 11:43 am
    Pennsylvania research just got easier, thanks to the release of Pennsylvania, Death Certificates 1906-1924. This collection contains more than 2.4 million records and has images of the actual death certificates.Statewide registration of births and deaths began on 1 January 1906. This collection of death certificates currently runs through the end of 1924 (later records will eventually be added to this collection).Here is the death certificate of Joe Boyer, a racecar driver who died after a crash at Altoona Speedway:Joseph Boyer, Jr. death certificateThis gives us good reminders about using…
  • Who Dat? It’s The Bayou State: New Louisiana State Research Guide

    Anne Gillespie Mitchell
    18 Apr 2014 | 9:49 am
    Louisiana Parishes and Parish SeatsWhen you think of Louisiana do you think of New Orleans? Mardi Gras? Hurricane Katrina? Or do you think of your ancestors? Louisiana has a rich and colorful past. The Spanish, French and British fought over it for more than 300 years until the United States obtained most of the state as part of the Louisiana Purchase in 1803.Louisiana is the only state in the nation that is made up of parishes and not counties. The entity parish is from the influence of the Roman Catholic Church, although counties and parishes function the same way in the modern day…
  • Tattoos: Signs of an “Interesting Past”

    Juliana Smith
    17 Apr 2014 | 1:48 pm
    Jack London is quoted as saying, “Show me a man with a tattoo and I’ll show you a man with an interesting past.” My great-great-grandfather, Thomas Howley, was certainly no exception. In 1864, he joined the U.S. Navy under an assumed name so his wife wouldn’t find out. (She found out. She was not happy.)In her Navy widow’s pension application that I found on Fold3.com, Jane reveals, “I do not remember any noticeable marks or scars on the person of my husband, Thomas Howley, only India ink tattooed on his arm consisting of the letters I.H.S. and as I remembered the image of the…
  • DNA Hints – Providing More Clarity To My DNA Results

    Anna Swayne
    16 Apr 2014 | 3:06 pm
    Last week we announced that the AncestryDNA team collectively has found 2.7 million DNA hints. 10 days later, we are nearing 3 million DNA hints – and the number is increasing as more and more people get tested and build out their family tree. Remember: a hint is more than a DNA match. You get a DNA hint when AncestryDNA has found a common ancestor you and a DNA match share.Mapping My MatchesI took a deeper dive into my own DNA hints and plotted them out on a fan chart to see which lines I had hints on and which lines I didn’t. Then, I took it one step further and plotted the hints…
 
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    personal-history « WordPress.com Tag Feed

  • Through the pain and out of fear

    Alexius Jorgensen
    26 Mar 2014 | 10:04 am
    To be content you must include much sorrow and enormously pain, but if you want nothing from the world, you get everything. Everything does not exclude anything, so it might be a painful transition, as you get as much pain as happiness. But when that is accepted, there´s relief and no more attempt to escape, what is in the moment. That is, if you accept the limitation of the world, where everything is defined by time and space. When you know, the world is not real, it´s easy to accept the world as it is, because then you know, you are not ´there´ – and it´s not serious anymore. Totally…
  • amazing tales from the abyss

    Pqw
    25 Mar 2014 | 11:13 pm
    I have been off Twitter for 70 hours, and I thought I was home free, but now I’m feeling so twitchy that I’ve eaten three sugary things in a row. Since I’ve essentially gone cold turkey on all of my (behavioral) addictions at once, self-soothing . . . is going to be kind of tricky. Maybe writing will help. Despite changing my names, twice; despite a penchant for burning bridges; despite a history in which “reconnecting with old friends” has tended to be an unmitigated disaster . . . some small part of me has managed to cling to an illusion that . . . someday . . . someone I…
  • An Evening in the Real World

    wjjhoge
    25 Mar 2014 | 6:27 pm
    I’ve spent most of this evening engaged in the real world. After work, Mrs. Hoge and I had some business to take care of near DC. After a leisurely dinner down there (Mmmm, Tilapia), the drive back to Westminster in the snow was pretty with the snow dusting the branches of the trees along the road. Now that I’m back at work more or less full time, there will be hours long periods when I don’t attend to blogging. I’m told that one of my most ardent readers has interpreted my having a real life interacting with the real world as hiding. No, it’s caused by having a…
  • Not a trick question

    gregadamyork
    25 Mar 2014 | 11:04 am
    gregadamyork:For many years I sought the answer to this question. Only recently am I coming to accep
  • because I needed a laugh this morning

    michelletempletonart
    25 Mar 2014 | 10:35 am
    Are jokes funny when translated into another language? Watch this video from The Guardian and see for yourself. This really made me laugh and it reminded me that sometimes context is everything. Wishing you lots of belly laughs on this rainy Tuesday!
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    The Geneaholic

  • My Genealogy Saturday - 19 April 2014

    19 Apr 2014 | 9:42 pm
    It wasn't a really big genealogy Saturday... I wasn't home for most of it, or at a repository either.*  Read email and blogs in a hurry, and left at 8:15 a.m. for UCSD and the CGSSD meeting.,*  Went to the 9 a.m. class on Ancestry led by Del Ritchhart.  I contributed a bit.  Then the snack break, and Judy Brooks' talk on Scottish Research.  Interesting, a good overview. *  Home by 12:30 p.m. to eat pizza for lunch, then noted that Surname Saturday - DeCAMP (France > New York > New Jersey) and Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Do Some Random…
  • My Genealogy Week - 13 to 18 April 2014

    18 Apr 2014 | 10:06 pm
    We went to Huntington Beach last Sunday to pick up the grandgirls and see their new home.  We brought the girls back to San Diego that night so their parents could get things organized.  They went home today. Each day I tried to get at least two blog posts out in the time I had to work on genealogy during the day and the evening.  That was complicated by the need to care for them (breakfast, dress, play, console, cajole, help, lunch, dinner, bath, bedtime) each day.  They went swimming with Linda on Monday and Tuesday, we all went to the San Diego Zoo Safari Park on…
  • My Genealogy Day - 12 April 2014

    12 Apr 2014 | 10:10 pm
    This may be the last journal report for almost a week - we get the grandgirls on Sunday until Friday and my writing time may be limited.*  Read email and blogs in a hurry.  Left at 9 a.m. for the SDGS meeting, got there at 9:30, talked to many friends, got a notebook of San Diego stuff from Donna, met Annette who knew my name because of the blog post, etc.  Annette's talk was spellbinding. *  Home by 12:30 p.m. to read, noted that Surname Saturday - ROLFE (England to New England) and Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - What Source Have You Used the…
  • My Geneaholic Friday - 11 April 2014

    11 Apr 2014 | 9:56 pm
    It was another full genealogy day, except for the Padres game, which was a gem, the best game of the year to date.*  Read email and blogs, noted that 52 Ancestors Week 15: #22 Henry Arnold White (1824-1885) of Killingly, Conn. posted and then wrote FGS 2014 Award Nominations Deadline is 15 June 2014.*  Wrote April 5th Saturday Workshop Review - New York Research and April 9th Research Group Meeting Review and three more posts on the Chula Vista Genealogy Cafe blog.*  Checked the EE blog and forums again, and wrote Should We Put…
  • My Geneaholic Monday - 10 April 2014

    10 Apr 2014 | 10:32 pm
    It was a pretty good genealogy day, since there were no local sports on TV.*  Read email and blogs, then wrote Treasure Chest Thursday - Post 209: 1789 Birth Record for Hannah Sawtell in Brookline, N.H. Town Records and Dear Randy: Can I Add a Source to my Software Program From FamilySearch Family Tree Sources? - Post 2: Legacy Family Tree and set it for later in the morning.*  Watched the DearMYRTLE video from RootsTech about Hangouts on air, and edited the New England talk one more time.  Saved it, put it in Dropbox and got it saved on the laptop.  *…
 
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    NPR: StoryCorps Podcast

  • StoryCorps 369: Buddies

    NPR
    10 Apr 2014 | 10:53 pm
    Collin Smith (23), who became quadriplegic after a car accident in high school, talks with Ernest Greene (72) who volunteered to go to college with Collin as his full-time caregiver.  Our second story was too risque for NPR so we're bringing it to you on the podcast. To hear more stories visit http://storycorps.org/listen. If you'd like to write to participants you can do so at podcast@storycorps.org. To make a donation visit http://www.storycorps.org/donate.Music:  "Send Off", "Send Off" by Explosions In The Sky and David Wingo -…
  • StoryCorps 366: Life After Afghanistan

    NPR
    30 Mar 2014 | 10:04 pm
    Retired Marine Corporal Anthony Villarreal talks with his wife, Jessica, about being severely injured during an IED attack while deployed to Afghanistan in 2008. Also, Army Captain Drew Pham, 26, tells his wife, Molly Pearl, about some of his most difficult combat memories.To hear more stories visit http://storycorps.org/listen. If you'd like to write to participants you can do so at podcast@storycorps.org. To make a donation visit http://www.storycorps.org/donate. Music:"Ticking Away" by Cranston "Photosphere" by Charles Atlas  "The Temperature of the Air on the…
  • StoryCorps 366: Remembering Exxon Valdez

    NPR
    24 Mar 2014 | 8:34 am
    LJ Evans and Suzanne Bishop remember working at an animal rescue clinic following the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989. To hear more stories visit http://storycorps.org/listen. If you'd like to write to participants you can do so at podcast@storycorps.org. To make a donation visit http://www.storycorps.org/donate. Music Info: "Demus" by Charles Atlas http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Charles_Atlas/ "Snowfall" by Sam McLoughlin & Alison Cooper - http://www.finderskeepersrecords.com/discog_dim005.html 
  • StoryCorps 365: We Are Family

    NPR
    16 Mar 2014 | 10:14 pm
    Megan Smith and Lisa Garzone talk about how their friendship developed after the death of Lisa's ex-husband and Megan's partner, John Joyce.To hear more stories visit http://storycorps.org/listen. If you'd like to write to participants you can do so at podcast@storycorps.org. To make a donation visit http://www.storycorps.org/donate. Music:"Sigue Sus Ojos" by Caravana 
  • StoryCorps 364: StoryCorps U

    NPR
    10 Mar 2014 | 11:04 am
    Aaron, whose last name we've withheld to protect his privacy, talks to his high school teacher Celeste Davis-Carr about being homeless and other hardships.  To hear more stories visit http://storycorps.org/listen. If you'd like to write to participants you can do so at podcast@storycorps.org. To make a donation visit http://www.storycorps.org/donate. Music:"A Spire" by Tape - http://www.tape.se/"El Tranvía" by Jenifer Avila- http://www.myspace.com/jeniferavila "Send Off" by Explosions In The Sky and David Wingo -…
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    What Endures...

  • History of Louisiana Cooperative Extension is Focus of New Oral History Project

    jabrah1
    4 Apr 2014 | 1:37 pm
    To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 1914 Smith-Lever Act, the LSU AgCenter, the LSU College of Agriculture, and the LSU Libraries T. Harry Williams Center for Oral History are collaborating to document the history of the LSU Cooperative Extension…Read more ›
  • Newly Available Interviews From The McKinley High Series

    jabrah1
    26 Mar 2014 | 6:38 am
    The early part of the year celebrates Black History Month and Women’s History Month.  To honor both, we’d like to share some content from the Williams Center’s collections as a reminder that women have been the backbone of social movements,…Read more ›
  • Walker Percy Festival Oral Histories

    jabrah1
    19 Mar 2014 | 6:32 am
    The Williams Center is proud to partner with Country Roads magazine’s executive editor, James Fox-Smith, to conduct oral history interviews in conjunction with the Walker Percy Literary Festival, being held June 6-8 in St. Francisville, LA.   For more information on the interview…Read more ›
  • Integrating LSU

    jabrah1
    28 Jan 2014 | 8:43 am
    By Leah Wood Jewett and Jennifer A. Cramer  (original source)   The story of the integration of LSU transcends black and white. It is a tale of human perseverance; a shared, unwavering belief in the ideals of democracy; and ultimately,…Read more ›
  • Maxine Crump to Moderate Civil Rights Film Discussion

    jabrah1
    16 Jan 2014 | 8:24 am
    To commemorate Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday, on Tuesday, January 21, LSU Libraries is hosting two events at Hill Memorial Library to kick start the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) grant funded film-based program, Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights…Read more ›
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    Brooklyn Historical Society Blog

  • Photo of the Week: The Changing City

    Halley Choiniere
    16 Apr 2014 | 2:30 am
    I recently visited my brother in Paris, and in preparation for this trip, I went to see an exhibit of historical photographs at the Metropolitan Museum – Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris. Beginning in the mid-19th century, a city planner named Baron Georges-Eugene Haussmann master-minded a program for the improvement and beautification of Paris, razing entire streets and neighborhoods in Paris with the same zeal that Robert Moses would adopt in New York City in the next century. The city of Paris hired photographer Charles Marville to chronicle the city’s transformation during this…
 
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    Video Biography Central

  • 5 Things We Always Regret at the End

    Jane Shafron
    19 Apr 2014 | 3:46 pm
    What will you regret, at the end? An Australian palliative care nurse named Bronnie Ware worked for years with the dying; easing their passing after medicine had done all it could. Reflecting on the many patients she cared for, she came to see how much people grew when they were faced by their own mortality. "Every single patient found their peace before they departed, every one of them." She also noticed recurring themes when folks reflected on their lives, and pondered the things they regretted. Late in 2011, she decided to write a blog about the top 5 things she had observed people felt…
  • The Spirit of Place and a Tribute in Video

    Jane Shafron
    19 Mar 2014 | 10:46 am
    Is there really such a thing as spirit of place? The ancient Romans certainly believed in guardian spirits, or genius loci, and made offerings to keep on their right side. The idea has evolved over time and is reflected in art and literature and the Romantic idea that a place can be more than the sum of its soil, its nature and structures, and its people - it can be enchanted.And if ever there was an enchanted land, a tough parched land promising plenty but demanding all, then it is the farms and fields surrounding Altus, Oklahoma where Peggy and Johnnie, and their ancestors going back to the…
  • It's Official: Nostalgia is Good for You

    Jane Shafron
    16 Nov 2013 | 12:31 pm
    Exciting new research reported this month in the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletinby Tim Wildschut and others shows that time spent reminiscing makes people more optimistic. This finding, which is consistent with previous, smaller studies, seems to retire forever the old canard that remembering the past suggests a fear of the future, is inherently maudlin and destined to make us sad.Perhaps the best description of the benefits of nostalgia (anticipating the research that was to follow) comes from the sociologist Fred Davis in 1977:"It (nostalgia) reassures us of past happiness and…
  • Why Write Your Own Obituary?

    Jane Shafron
    14 Sep 2013 | 5:00 pm
    "Marianne Theresa John­son-Reddick born Jan 4, 1935 and died alone on [Aug.] 30, 2013. She is sur­vived by her 6 of 8 children whom she spent her lifetime torturing in every way pos­sible." So wrotetwo of those aforementioned - and unfortunate - children in a recent obituary appearing in the Reno Gazette-Journal. And, to rub salt in the wound, the scathing obituary went viral, appearing in all the major media from ABC News to USA Today and on and on around the world and back again.Poor Mrs Johnson-Reddick, not only dead but globally vilified.Why write your own obituary?  Well, to…
  • Best Online Storage for Family Historians

    Jane Shafron
    22 Jun 2013 | 3:35 pm
    Our roles as personal and family historians is to collect, restore, explain, share and archive all the varied artifacts of our ancestors' lives. Fair summary?The things we collect might be hard copy objects like photographs, old school yearbooks, 16mm film, audio recordings, and letters and cards. Or it might be new material like stories we hear and record on audio or video, or stories we write. It might be our research with ancestry.com and all the census and immigration records we locate.These days, our job as family historians (self appointed though we may be!) includes digitizing the…
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    sex in the country, life in the chillWorld

  • divorcing my mom (working title)

    Elissa Jane Mastel
    20 Apr 2014 | 5:33 am
    I think most daughters have challenges in their relationship with their mom.  It's probably also true that most people struggle to identify and connect with their parents.  We all have things about growing up we wish we could change.... and for a long time, I thought my life at home was just those things. My parents taught me I was a difficult child.  My mother wished I had never been born, and scolded me and hit me for so many things I lost track of all the wrongs I committed from when I was very young to the very present.I don't know how many times I've said sorry but not…
  • limits to love

    Elissa Jane Mastel
    4 Aug 2013 | 5:33 am
    Sangham saranam gacchāmiI go for refuge in the Sanghathere are three jewels of practice. the buddha, dharma and sangha. sangha, community, support network... I find that the more that I morph, the more challenging it is to keep a strong support system around me.  and the more I grow, the more distant I become to a life that once defined me.last night, I had a glimpse into the heart of someone who chooses self-destruction.  it was a repugnant place, and I'm not interested in going there ever again myself or vicariously through someone else.  he expressed that my inability to…
  • the little gorilla loves himself

    Elissa Jane Mastel
    21 Jul 2013 | 1:45 pm
    "Everybody in the forest loves the Little Gorilla,But like all little gorillas, he begins to grow,and grow, and grow. Until one day, Little Gorilla is BIG!"each year, at my son's birthday party I go around the table of his friends and ask the same question, "what do you like best about Zoren?"this year, his little group of pals answered; he's the wild card, he's like a labyrinth, he's crazy, you never know what to expect.... maybe I had already doled out too much sugar and junk food before posing this annual poll to his pals, but I found their responses fascinating. to me, he's just this kid,…
  • this guy was meant for me.....

    Elissa Jane Mastel
    17 Jul 2013 | 10:51 am
    I’m going to tell you a story so personal, only a handful of people know it. A story about me that reveals more than most people know a story I was trying to spit out over dinner yesterday with a friend... but couldn’t... because I’m better at divulging myself more eloquently on "paper" than with my mouth...If you could see a younger version of me... the one that was twenty nine, you would meet a woman who commanded a certain power and leadership. Independent, smart and rising in the ranks of the NYC agency scene, I was racing to the zenith of something with a wake of broken hearts…
  • Green Grass of Home

    Elissa Jane Mastel
    20 May 2013 | 10:52 am
    Originally Published in HOUSE Magazine in 2007...Green Grass of HomeA former New Yorker discovers the joy of mowing a jungle.I’m the quintessential city girl. I grew up on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. So when my son was born almost five years ago, I thought the ideal place to raise him was New York City. The city had all the amenities, activities, and culture I could want. But as he grew, I realized I’d not only had enough of listening to my then-husband complain about urban life, but that it was time for us to own our own home and have our own yard for our son to play in.Moving upstate…
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    Empty Nest Genealogy

  • Genealogy News Bites – April 19, 2014

    Christine Blythe
    19 Apr 2014 | 1:07 pm
    In an effort to help ease the ‘news’ and ‘research’ load, I prepare a ‘Genealogy News Bites’ post to gather together what I feel are the most important or... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions – April 17, 2014

    Christine Blythe
    17 Apr 2014 | 11:20 am
    The following are the most recent updates and additions to both Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org.   FamilySearch.org Australia Australia, Tasmania, Correspondence of the Immigration Office... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Historic Graveyard Tour at Fort Anne

    Christine Blythe
    16 Apr 2014 | 6:39 am
    A few years ago, we took a driving tour of Acadian heritage sites in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, Canada. The first stop we made in Nova Scotia was at a campbground near Annapolis Royal and I... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Transcriptions: Documents relating to the marrage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson – Part II.

    Christine Blythe
    13 Apr 2014 | 9:58 am
       These documents are a continuation of Part I of this post. ____________________________________________________ Transcriptions: Documents relating to the marrage of Clifford Carter and... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Brig. Gen. Evan Shelby Jr.

    Christine Blythe
    12 Apr 2014 | 1:11 am
    Brig. Gen. Evan Shelby Jr. of Tregaron, Wales Brigadier General Evan S. Shelby Jr., born in 1725 in Tregaron, Ceredigion, Wales to Evan (Dhu) Shelby (Selby) and his wife Catherine Morgan and was... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
 
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  • Our Ancestors’ Easter Parades & Spring Fashions

    Gena Philibert-Ortega
    20 Apr 2014 | 6:57 am
    Our Ancestors’ Easter Parades & Spring Fashions was originally published at .Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this guest blog post, Gena searches old newspapers to learn about our ancestors’ spring fashions—and the popular Easter parades they strolled in to show off those fine new clothes. What are your memories of Easter? Egg hunts, baskets overflowing with chocolate bunnies, posing for a photograph with an oversized rabbit, or maybe waking up early for church services? My Easter holiday memories revolve…
  • Researching the San Francisco Earthquake of 1906 in the News

    Tony Pettinato
    18 Apr 2014 | 8:44 am
    Researching the San Francisco Earthquake of 1906 in the News was originally published at .It was early on a Wednesday morning, with most of the residents of San Francisco peacefully sleeping, when disaster suddenly struck the City by the Bay. At 5:13 a.m. on 18 April 1906 an earthquake tremor for about 20 seconds was followed by a major 7.9 magnitude earthquake that shook the city for over 40 seconds, jolting terrified residents awake as buildings collapsed around them. Photo: massive flames engulf San Francisco during the 1906 earthquake. Credit: Harry Sterling Hooper; Wikipedia. Earthquake…
  • Tips on How to Search for Your Ancestors’ Hometowns & Townships

    Duncan Kuehn
    17 Apr 2014 | 9:15 am
    Tips on How to Search for Your Ancestors’ Hometowns & Townships was originally published at .Introduction: Duncan Kuehn is a professional genealogist with over eight years of client experience. She has worked on several well-known projects, such as “Who Do You Think You Are?” and researching President Barack Obama’s ancestry. In this guest blog post, Duncan shows how to find information about your ancestral hometown using GenealogyBank’s collections of historical documents and old newspapers, as well as a couple of other helpful websites. GenealogyBank is not only a great…
  • Assassination of President Lincoln: History of an Epic Tragedy

    Scott Phillips
    16 Apr 2014 | 8:29 am
    Assassination of President Lincoln: History of an Epic Tragedy was originally published at .Introduction: Scott Phillips is a genealogical historian and owner of Onward To Our Past® genealogy services. In this guest blog post—to commemorate the fact that this week marks the 149th anniversary of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln—Scott searches old newspapers to see how this traumatic news was reported to our ancestors in the nation’s newspapers. The American Civil War effectively ended with the surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee to Union General Ulysses S. Grant…
  • Tracing ‘Titanic’ Genealogy: Survivor Passenger Lists & More

    Gena Philibert-Ortega
    15 Apr 2014 | 9:16 am
    Tracing ‘Titanic’ Genealogy: Survivor Passenger Lists & More was originally published at .Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this guest blog post, Gena searches old newspapers to find out more about the tragedy of the sinking of the Titanic—and shows how helpful those articles can be with your own family history research. The Titanic was fast sinking. After she went down the cries were horrible. This was at 2:20 a.m. by a man’s watch who stood next to me. At this time three other boats and ours kept…
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